eponym


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ep·o·nym

 (ĕp′ə-nĭm′)
n.
1. A word or name derived from a proper noun. The words atlas, bowdlerize, denim, and Turing machine are eponyms.
2. One whose name is or is thought to be the source of the name of something: Alexander Garden is the eponym of the gardenia.

[French éponyme, from Greek epōnumos, named after : epi-, epi- + onoma, onuma, name; see nō̆-men- in Indo-European roots.]

ep′o·nym′ic adj.

eponym

(ˈɛpəˌnɪm)
n
1. a name, esp a place name, derived from the name of a real or mythical person, as for example Constantinople from Constantine I
2. the name of the person from which such a name is derived: in the Middle Ages, "Brutus" was thought to be the eponym of "Britain".
[C19: from Greek epōnumos giving a significant name]
ˌepoˈnymic adj

ep•o•nym

(ˈɛp ə nɪm)

n.
1. a person, real or imaginary, from whom something takes or is said to take its name.
2. a word based on or derived from a person's name.
[1840–50]
ep`o•nym′ic, adj.

eponym

1. the name of a real or legendary person that has been applied to a thing, institution, etc, as atlas.
2. the name of a person that is used to describe a time or period, as the Augustan Age. — eponymic, eponymous, adj.
See also: Names

eponym

A person’s name from which the name of a place or thing is derived.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eponym - the person for whom something is named; "Constantine I is the eponym for Constantinople"
name - a language unit by which a person or thing is known; "his name really is George Washington"; "those are two names for the same thing"
2.eponym - the name derived from a person (real or imaginary); "Down's syndrome is an eponym for the English physician John Down"
name - a language unit by which a person or thing is known; "his name really is George Washington"; "those are two names for the same thing"
Translations
eponymum
eponyymi
eponimo
名祖
eponiem
epônimo
eponym

eponym

n (Ling) → Eponym nt

ep·o·nym

n. epónimo, uso del nombre propio de una persona para nombrar instrumentos médicos, anomalías o síndromes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pittsfield was losing its team in the Class A New York-Penn League to Troy, New York, where the taxpayers of the aptly (if obscenely) nicknamed Empire State had built Joseph Bruno Stadium, its eponym the convicted-but-later-acquitted-of-corruption Republican State Senate leader.
The new car, which takes its name from one of the most charming villages on the Italian Riviera, an eponym for stylish elegance, is the most versatile model in the current-day range.
PubMed was searched using the Medical Subject Heading of the name of the eponym and text words associated with the sign.
Twenty-seven texts, including six of the "strays," are dated by the eponym system, twelve names being recognizable, the earliest the official for 676 BC, the latest being in the "post-canonical" period, perhaps down to 619.
The new car, which takes its name, Portofino, from one of the most charming villages on the Italian Riviera, an eponym for stylish elegance, is the most versatile model in the range.
The author, not at all intimidated by the comparison with the erstwhile eponym by Massenet, wrote: "His [opera] will be understood by its French, with powder and minuets.
While Ferragamo's technical strides are a pillar of the label's legacy, the brand's eponym's penchant for bold colors--as seen in his made-to-measure footwear for Hollywood stars including Judy Garland and royalty such as Indira Devi, Maharani of Cooch Behar--are hardly forgotten.
Novice searchers and those without formal training may find a search for comprehensive diseasespecific literature to be inconsistent and confusing, based on whether a medical eponym is searched in the possessive or non-possessive form.
The criterion that the new eponym - "namesake" is what Coleman Hall would be; Ed Coleman would be the eponym of Coleman Hall - be dead at least a year is purely arbitrary.
EPONYM A Greek poem B One who gives their name to something C Narrow band of cuticle who am I?