eponym


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ep·o·nym

 (ĕp′ə-nĭm′)
n.
1. A word or name derived from a proper noun. The words atlas, bowdlerize, denim, and Turing machine are eponyms.
2. One whose name is or is thought to be the source of the name of something: Alexander Garden is the eponym of the gardenia.

[French éponyme, from Greek epōnumos, named after : epi-, epi- + onoma, onuma, name; see nō̆-men- in Indo-European roots.]

ep′o·nym′ic adj.

eponym

(ˈɛpəˌnɪm)
n
1. a name, esp a place name, derived from the name of a real or mythical person, as for example Constantinople from Constantine I
2. the name of the person from which such a name is derived: in the Middle Ages, "Brutus" was thought to be the eponym of "Britain".
[C19: from Greek epōnumos giving a significant name]
ˌepoˈnymic adj

ep•o•nym

(ˈɛp ə nɪm)

n.
1. a person, real or imaginary, from whom something takes or is said to take its name.
2. a word based on or derived from a person's name.
[1840–50]
ep`o•nym′ic, adj.

eponym

1. the name of a real or legendary person that has been applied to a thing, institution, etc, as atlas.
2. the name of a person that is used to describe a time or period, as the Augustan Age. — eponymic, eponymous, adj.
See also: Names

eponym

A person’s name from which the name of a place or thing is derived.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eponym - the person for whom something is named; "Constantine I is the eponym for Constantinople"
name - a language unit by which a person or thing is known; "his name really is George Washington"; "those are two names for the same thing"
2.eponym - the name derived from a person (real or imaginary); "Down's syndrome is an eponym for the English physician John Down"
name - a language unit by which a person or thing is known; "his name really is George Washington"; "those are two names for the same thing"
Translations
eponymum
eponyymi
eponimo
名祖
eponiem
epônimo
eponym

eponym

n (Ling) → Eponym nt

ep·o·nym

n. epónimo, uso del nombre propio de una persona para nombrar instrumentos médicos, anomalías o síndromes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Today, "Tater Tots" has become a proprietary eponym, the downside being that any generic knockoff that looks like a Tater Tot is called a Tater Tot.
gov/pmc/articles/PMC3064755/) Jean-Martin Charcot , the founder of modern clinical neurology, coined the eponym "Tourette syndrome" after his student, Georges Albert Gilles de la Tourette, who in 1885 described nine patients suffering from the tic "malady.
The criterion that the new eponym - "namesake" is what Coleman Hall would be; Ed Coleman would be the eponym of Coleman Hall - be dead at least a year is purely arbitrary.
The texts may be studied by ruler, often within eponym or year, or by type, such as distribution of tools for use by court artisans, or by the names of persons, places, or deities.
EPONYM A Greek poem B One who gives their name to something C Narrow band of cuticle who am I?
The film never descends to the merely preachy: its canine eponym is engaging and unpredictable (he runs riot in the local 'Maritime Village' in a wittily filmed episode); the human relations are warmly, but not sentimentally, written and played; and the real-life elements involving Swampy and his maremma dog are skilfully integrated with the needs of entertainment.
There are occasions when the eponym is not long lasting.
2) The disorder was further elaborated and delineated as a distinct clinico-pathological entity by Biemond (1957) and Boder and Sedgwick (1957); these latter authors suggested the name Ataxia-telangiectasia and Centerwall and Meller (1958) proposed the eponym Louis-Bar Syndrome.
In honor of his contributions to the study of Chagas disease vectors, Ryckman was honored with an eponym in 1972: Triatoma ryckmani, a rare species from Central America (14).
Which Scandinavian politician's name became an eponym for a traitor?
was produced in Utrecht for the eponym, perhaps when she became Duchess
Insofar as the title is an eponym of the last poem in the book, both title and poem frame the collection, giving it a circular shape from beginning to end.