equative


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eq·ua·tive

 (ĕk′wə-tĭv)
adj.
Of, relating to, or being a form of an adjective or adverb indicating identity of degree of comparison.
n.
1. The equative degree.
2. An adjective or adverb expressing the equative degree.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

equative

(ˈɛkwətɪv)
adj
denoting the equivalence or identity of two terms
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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An equative sentence can also stand by itself as a paragraph to summarize ...
Here, Hejinian thematizes the multiple exposure of meaning at the expense of reading: "Transitive, intransitive, equative: these are all ways of dealing with the world" (Quartermain 1992, 22).
4.1 The equative pseudo-cleft structure of biclausal wh-questions
But, only Samoyedic uses the same PX.2SG in non-verbal predication of the equative type.
{absolutive} can appear alone or with another functor, locative or source of the action, or another absolutive (giving an equative, such as Bill is the culprit).
Nominal predicates can provide a greater variety of constructions such as equative, existential, topic-comment, and 'it-is-named' constructions.
It seems that every language picked a spatial case at hand or even developed a completely distinct marker like the Tsez Equative suffix.
Here the possessor is the logical subject, while the possessed object is the grammatical subject of an equative sentence.
Second, they favour -or even require- an indefinite or zero article attribute (see further Fernandez Leborans, 1999: 2372-2379 for a more detailed account of the choice of the article in relation to the distinction between characterizing and equative attribution).