equatorward

equatorward

(ɪˈkweɪtəˌwʊd)
adj
(Navigation) toward the equator
References in periodicals archive ?
The influence of CCW is attributed to the equatorward flow occurring mainly during winterspring months (Ambriz-Arreola et al.
In the December 1st Nature, four geophysicists led by James Keane (University of Arizona) make the case that the big basin initially existed much farther north, near latitude 60[degrees], and gradually migrated equatorward.
Patrick's Day storm and several smaller storms -- the team found that many people reported seeing the aurora further equatorward (that is, farther south in the Northern Hemisphere, and farther north in the Southern Hemisphere) than the OVATION Prime model suggests.
Patricks Day storm and several smaller storms the team found that many people reported seeing the aurora further equatorward (that is, farther south in the Northern Hemisphere, and farther north in the Southern Hemisphere) than the OVATION Prime model suggests.
The floats were swept equatorward by the Deep Western Boundary Current, confirming what Stommel and Arons had predicted by mathematical equations alone.
A warm sector is the forecasting term for whatever exists equatorward of the warm and cold fronts.
During the summer, the cold, equatorward flowing California Current system has a seasonal maximum (7.
This wind shift is part of the larger, unusual atmospheric pattern accompanying El Nino events, in which a high-pressure system hovers over the Philippines and the major rain band of the South Pacific rapidly shifts equatorward.
The region off the western coast of the Baja California peninsula is considered a transition region where the relatively cold equatorward flow of the California Current meets with warmer tropical and subtropical waters.
The equatorward portion of each subtropical anticyclone is interpreted as the Kelvin-wave response to the monsoon heating over the continent to the west, while the Rossby-wave response to the west of the monsoon, interacting with the midlatitude westerlies, produces a region of adiabatic descent.
edulis is historically found from the Arctic Sea (66[degrees]N) to North Carolina (Dall, 1889), although there are conflicting reports about the exact location of the equatorward limit.