equivalence principle


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to equivalence principle: general relativity

equivalence principle

n.
A principle central to the theory of general relativity stating that a gravitational field is locally indistinguishable from the effects of an inertial force, such as the acceleration caused by a source of propulsion.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The idea, scientifically called the equivalence principle, has been tried and validated on a number of occasions on Earth.
CAL research findings will facilitate the development of future ultra-cold atom-based quantum sensors for gravitational and magnetic fields, rotations and tests of the equivalence principle.
The equivalence principle (EP) is intrinsically connected to the history of gravitation theory and has played an important role in its development.
This brings to mind Einstein's equivalence principle in troduced in the analysis of accelerated frames of reference in general relativity.
The other one is domain decomposition methods based on integral equations, including equivalence principle algorithm (EPA) [5-7], linear embedding via Green's operator (LEGO) [8], and generalized transition matrix (GTM) [9].
The new method is considered to be a significant tribute to Einstein on the 100th anniversary of his first formulation of the Equivalence Principle, which is a key component of Einstein's theory of General Relativity.
A further long-term objective is to examine Einstein's equivalence principle by which the acceleration of a body by a gravitational field is independent of the nature of the body - all objects subjected to the same gravity "fall at the same speed".
The role of homogeneous gravitational fields in the formulation of the equivalence principle and in the foundation of Einstein's theory of gravitation is well known, say Schucking and Surowitz, but he originally treated the concepts in terms of Newtonian gravity and for small velocities.
Section 6 gives the generalized Green's theorem that can be used for surface equivalence principle and surface integral equations.
General relativity's strong equivalence principle states that gravity should have the same effect on this binding energy as it would on an equivalent amount of mass.
The system gives the scientists the best opportunity yet to discover a violation of a concept called the Equivalence Principle. This principle states that the effect of gravity on a body does not depend on the nature or internal structure of that body.