equivocality


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e·quiv·o·cal

 (ĭ-kwĭv′ə-kəl)
adj.
1. Open to two or more interpretations and often intended to conceal the truth. See Synonyms at ambiguous.
2. Characterized by a mixture of opposing elements and therefore questionable or uncertain: Evidence of the drug's effectiveness has been equivocal.

[From Late Latin aequivocus : Latin aequi-, equi- + Latin vocāre, to call; see wekw- in Indo-European roots.]

e·quiv′o·cal′i·ty (-kăl′ĭ-tē), e·quiv′o·cal·ness n.
e·quiv′o·cal·ly adv.

equivocality, equivocacy

the state or quality of being ambiguous in meaning or capable of double interpretation. — equivocal, adj.
See also: Punning
the state or quality of being ambiguous in meaning or capable of double interpretation. — equivocal, adj.
See also: Language
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

equivocality

noun
An expression or term liable to more than one interpretation:
References in periodicals archive ?
In a multitasking team where various simultaneous performances are called for, equivocality can occur between the task for individual or for team.
Internal and external integration for product development: the contingency effects of uncertainty, equivocality and platform strategy.
Aristotle's notion of homonymy is not that of equivocality or ambiguity, though the former may be derived from the latter.
The equivocality, purposelessness, and openness of Walther's work actually requires users to assume odd positions of physical vulnerability and to undertake disturbing activities steeped in uncertainty about what one is doing, for how long, and why.
Environmental uncertainty and equivocality continue to create rich sense-making environs (Weick, 1993).
What specific criteria determine the functions that can or should be performed at a central hub and which functions should be present in a regional entity to increase the speed and reach of information while decreasing equivocality?
One possible reason for the equivocality of past research on media-based interventions is that the counter-exemplar in question must be capable of overriding heavy news consumers' default tendency to generalize from chronically accessible exemplars derived from frequent news consumption.