eradicable


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e·rad·i·cate

 (ĭ-răd′ĭ-kāt′)
tr.v. e·rad·i·cat·ed, e·rad·i·cat·ing, e·rad·i·cates
1. To tear up by the roots: "They loosened the soil and eradicated the weeds" (James Macauley).
2. To get rid of; eliminate: Their goal was to eradicate poverty. See Synonyms at eliminate.

[Middle English eradicaten, from Latin ērādīcāre, ērādīcāt- : ē-, ex-, ex- + rādīx, rādīc-, root; see wrād- in Indo-European roots.]

e·rad′i·ca·ble (-kə-bəl) adj.
e·rad′i·ca′tion n.
e·rad′i·ca′tive adj.
e·rad′i·ca′tor n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.eradicable - able to be eradicated or rooted out
ineradicable - not able to be destroyed or rooted out; "ineradicable superstitions"
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, it is one of the primary reasons why eradicable infectious diseases persist today.
Human-mediated Escalation of a Formerly Eradicable Problem: The Invasion of Caribbean Frogs in the Hawaiian Islands.
Because polio can be prevented through vaccination, Japan and other members of the international community are focusing efforts on eliminating polio as the next eradicable infectious disease after smallpox.
Mr Gates, worth $79bn, said at the school: "This is an eradicable disease by taking the best of science and Liverpool is a great example of that.
Low levels of child malnutrition in Saudia Arabia are, I believe, eradicable.
9) Lymphatic Filariasis was considered eradicable or potentially eradicable disease by International task force for the disease eradication.
Since the disease is easily diagnosed and can be controlled with simple interventions like clean-water campaigns, the WHO identifies it as an eradicable disease.
Polio is eradicable and we must strive to eradicate it.
117) To that end, the TAP lists eight standards by which to measure success; one such marker is whether or not "[p]riority small and isolated eradicable populations of feral pigs have been removed.
Health workers were encouraged to think that the disease was eradicable because, as with smallpox--which was vanquished in 1979 after a 12-year campaign--humans are the only reservoir in which it can survive.