eremitism


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eremitism

1. the state of being a hermit.
2. an attitude favoring solitude and seclusion. — eremite, n.eremitic, adj.
See also: Attitudes
1. the state of being a hermit.
2. an attitude favoring solitude and seclusion. — eremite, n. — eremitic, adj.
See also: Self
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eremitism - monasticism characterized by solitude in which the social dimension of life is sacrificed to the primacy of religious experience
monasticism - asceticism as a form of religious life; usually conducted in a community under a common rule and characterized by celibacy and poverty and obedience
References in periodicals archive ?
Eremitism was thus a quietist expression of the elites' reluctance to bow to the sway of fate and luck and desire for agency in grasping their destiny.
The piece combines eremitism, poetry, and art in much the same spirit as the Chinese literati.
Christmas-Eve" hints at dream visions and pilgrimages, toys with the idea of eremitism, but finally escapes them all to affirm spiritual value in the visions of Christ that leads him to unfurl the world and look to it, in it, and at it.
Both of these interpretations indicate that eremitism should be seen as reflecting and helping to shape wider spiritual developments in Christian society.
For mystical Islam, justice is a call of the divine Truth itself, inviting us to witness in public life, which is exactly what Gandhi did, contrary to the antisocial eremitism of most Hindu ascetics.
The paintings suggest not merely aesthetic tradition, but an acutely self-enclosed beauty, an eremitism of rustling silk that seems an expression of both withdrawal and repudiation.
The concept of eremitism in Chinese culture is a broad one.
Specific topics include eremitism (solitary monasticism) and the pastoral in the 17th century poetry of Ruan Dacheng; the textual and visual modes of production of a particular publishing house, the relationship between language reforms and social change in the Republican era (1911-1949), and women's publishing ventures as a means of rewriting literary history.
Eremitism, or the search for solitude as undertaken by the first monks in the Egyptian desert, is compared to the rest cure prescribed by the American doctor Silas Weir Mitchell.
On eremitism as the necessary corrective to cenobitism (and vice versa), see Harpham (21-28).
For example, I am still unsure how Brant's devotion to Onuphrius was specifically "humanist," rather than more of the same fifteenth-century interest in eremitism that can be noted in the case of, say, Nikolaus von Flue.
Cass is nonetheless astute in distinguishing feminine eremitism from Western solitude, which "is essentially a masculine trait" (p.