erode

(redirected from erodible)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

e·rode

 (ĭ-rōd′)
v. e·rod·ed, e·rod·ing, e·rodes
v.tr.
1. To wear (something) away by erosion: Waves eroded the shore.
2. To eat into or eat away the substance of: Acidic water erodes pipes. Arthritis had eroded the cartilage.
3. To make or form by wearing away: The river eroded a deep valley.
4. To cause to diminish or deteriorate: "Long enduring peace often erodes popular resolution" (C.L. Sulzberger).
v.intr.
1. To become worn or eaten away: The cliffs have eroded over the centuries.
2. To diminish or deteriorate: Public confidence in the administration eroded.

[Latin ērōdere, to gnaw off, eat away : ē-, ex-, ex- + rōdere, to gnaw; see rēd- in Indo-European roots.]

e·rod′i·bil′i·ty n.
e·rod′i·ble adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

erode

(ɪˈrəʊd)
vb
1. to grind or wear down or away or become ground or worn down or away
2. to deteriorate or cause to deteriorate: jealousy eroded the relationship.
3. (Pathology) (tr; usually passive) pathol to remove (tissue) by ulceration
[C17: from Latin ērōdere, from ex-1 + rōdere to gnaw]
eˈrodent adj, n
eˈrodible, eˈrodable adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

e•rode

(ɪˈroʊd)

v. e•rod•ed, e•rod•ing. v.t.
1. to eat into or away; destroy by slow disintegration.
2. to form (a gully, butte, etc.) by erosion.
v.i.
3. to become eroded.
[1605–15; < Latin ērōdere=ē- e- + rōdere to gnaw]
e•rod′i•ble, adj.
e•rod`i•bil′i•ty, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

erode


Past participle: eroded
Gerund: eroding

Imperative
erode
erode
Present
I erode
you erode
he/she/it erodes
we erode
you erode
they erode
Preterite
I eroded
you eroded
he/she/it eroded
we eroded
you eroded
they eroded
Present Continuous
I am eroding
you are eroding
he/she/it is eroding
we are eroding
you are eroding
they are eroding
Present Perfect
I have eroded
you have eroded
he/she/it has eroded
we have eroded
you have eroded
they have eroded
Past Continuous
I was eroding
you were eroding
he/she/it was eroding
we were eroding
you were eroding
they were eroding
Past Perfect
I had eroded
you had eroded
he/she/it had eroded
we had eroded
you had eroded
they had eroded
Future
I will erode
you will erode
he/she/it will erode
we will erode
you will erode
they will erode
Future Perfect
I will have eroded
you will have eroded
he/she/it will have eroded
we will have eroded
you will have eroded
they will have eroded
Future Continuous
I will be eroding
you will be eroding
he/she/it will be eroding
we will be eroding
you will be eroding
they will be eroding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been eroding
you have been eroding
he/she/it has been eroding
we have been eroding
you have been eroding
they have been eroding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been eroding
you will have been eroding
he/she/it will have been eroding
we will have been eroding
you will have been eroding
they will have been eroding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been eroding
you had been eroding
he/she/it had been eroding
we had been eroding
you had been eroding
they had been eroding
Conditional
I would erode
you would erode
he/she/it would erode
we would erode
you would erode
they would erode
Past Conditional
I would have eroded
you would have eroded
he/she/it would have eroded
we would have eroded
you would have eroded
they would have eroded
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.erode - become ground down or deteriorate; "Her confidence eroded"
decay, dilapidate, crumble - fall into decay or ruin; "The unoccupied house started to decay"
2.erode - remove soil or rock; "Rain eroded the terraces"
damage - inflict damage upon; "The snow damaged the roof"; "She damaged the car when she hit the tree"
wash - form by erosion; "The river washed a ravine into the mountainside"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

erode

verb
1. disintegrate, crumble, deteriorate, corrode, break up, grind down, waste away, wear down or away By 1980, Miami beach had all but totally eroded.
2. destroy, consume, spoil, crumble, eat away, corrode, break up, grind down, abrade, wear down or away Once exposed, soil is quickly eroded by wind and rain.
3. weaken, destroy, undermine, diminish, impair, lessen, wear away His fumbling of the issue of reform has eroded his authority.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

erode

verb
To consume gradually, as by chemical reaction or friction:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
يَحِتُّ، يُفَتِّتُ، يَتَآكَل
erodereudhule
erodierenzerfressen
erodálkimar
veîra, sverfa, eyîa
erozijaėstigraužti
grauztizskalotsaēst
erodovať
aşın mak

erode

[ɪˈrəʊd]
A. VT
1. (lit) (Geol) → erosionar; [acid] → corroer
2. (fig) [+ confidence, power, authority] → mermar; [+ support, rights] → reducir
inflation has eroded the value of their savingsla inflación ha mermado el valor de sus ahorros
B. VI
1. (Geol) → erosionarse
2. (fig) [confidence] → mermarse; [support] → disminuir
support for his party is erodingel apoyo a su partido está disminuyendo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

erode

[ɪˈrəʊd]
vt (= wear away) [+ soil, rock] → éroder; [+ metal] → ronger
(= destroy) [+ authority, freedom] → rogner
vi
(= wear away) [rock, soil] → s'éroder
(= disappear) [authority, confidence] → s'érodererogenous zone [ɪˈrɒdʒənəszəʊn] nzone f érogène
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

erode

vt (glacier, water, sea)auswaschen, erodieren (spec); (acid)ätzen; (rust)wegfressen, anfressen; (fig) confidence, power, values, beliefsuntergraben; authorityunterminieren; differentialsaushöhlen; valueabtragen, untergraben
vi (value)abgetragen werden
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

erode

[ɪˈrəʊd] vt (Geol) → erodere; (metal) (fig) → corrodere
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

erode

(iˈrəud) verb
to eat or wear away (metals etc); to destroy gradually. Acids erode certain metals; Water has eroded the rock; The individual's right to privacy is being eroded.
eˈrosion (-ʒən) noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

erode

vt erosionar
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Barrier islands are made of sandy, erodible soil and are subject to high-energy wave action.
In 1990, for instance, spending on conservation programs amounted to $1.9 billion, most of which paid for retirement of highly erodible land.
Some farmers said that developers were in many cases developing marginal land with highly erodible soil, which might result in unexpected development impacts.
"These deposits can be remobilised by rainwater and generate lahars (mud flows) by themselves and or by incorporating existing erodible material on channel banks," Phivolcs warned in an advisory.
"These deposits can be remobilized by rainwater and generate lahars by themselves and or by incorporating existing erodible material on channel banks," Phivolcs said.
Under current compliance requirements, farm program benefits could be denied to producers who fail to implement and maintain an approved soil conservation system on highly erodible land, convert highly erodible grasslands to crop production without applying an approved soil conservation system, or convert a wetland to crop production.
Bridge piers that are located on highly erodible beds are subjected to failure due to scour caused by the structure obstructing:flow.
As Fernandez de Castro wrote to me, "All erodible material--that which (un)consciously takes part in a process of erosion--is in the process of placing itself elsewhere." The discarded, the useless, the hitherto unknown--these stones that, for centuries, have given shape to jales--are ineffectual remains; they are remnants that, though tiny, never disappear but rather change their place, along with their formal and material configuration.
For example, a clean, non-cohesive sand is highly erodible under the erosive action of water sheet but in appropriate slope angle it can be a non-erodible material, as observed in sand dunes (NOGAMI; VILLIBOR, 1995).
Actually, the sand obtained from offshore is usually coarser than the native sand and hence less erodible. The real question involving beach nourishment is the issue of who profits and who pays because the lion's share of the cost of restoring beaches is borne by the American taxpayers as a whole, most of whom will never visit those beaches.
Among the damaging processes are plowing grasslands on highly erodible soils and slopes to plant annual crops, destroying diverse mixtures of native perennial grassland species to plant monocultures of domesticated grasses, overgrazing pastures, and failing to properly rotate grazing livestock.