erosion

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Related to erosional: depositional

e·ro·sion

 (ĭ-rō′zhən)
n.
1. The group of natural processes, including weathering, dissolution, abrasion, corrosion, and transportation, by which material is worn away from the earth's surface.
2. The superficial destruction of bodily tissue by friction, pressure, ulceration, or trauma.
3. The process of eroding or the condition of being eroded: erosion of confidence in the governor; erosion of the value of the dollar.

[Latin ērōsiō, ērōsiōn-, an eating away, from ērōsus, eaten away; see erose.]

e·ro′sion·al adj.
e·ro′sion·al·ly adv.

erosion

(ɪˈrəʊʒən)
n
1. (Geological Science) the wearing away of rocks and other deposits on the earth's surface by the action of water, ice, wind, etc
2. the act or process of eroding or the state of being eroded
eˈrosive, eˈrosional adj

e•ro•sion

(ɪˈroʊ ʒən)

n.
1. the act or process of eroding.
2. the state of being eroded.
3. the process by which the surface of the earth is worn away by the action of water, glaciers, winds, waves, etc.
[1535–45; < Latin ērōsiō. See erode, -tion]
e•ro′sion•al, adj.

e·ro·sion

(ĭ-rō′zhən)
The gradual wearing away of land surface materials, especially rocks, sediments, and soils, by the action of water, wind, or a glacier. Usually erosion also involves the transfer of eroded material from one place to another, as from the top of a mountain to an adjacent valley, or from the upstream portion of a river to the downstream portion.

erosion

The removal of loose mineral particles by wind, water, and moving ice.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.erosion - (geology) the mechanical process of wearing or grinding something down (as by particles washing over it)erosion - (geology) the mechanical process of wearing or grinding something down (as by particles washing over it)
geology - a science that deals with the history of the earth as recorded in rocks
chatter mark - marks on a glaciated rock caused by the movement of a glacier
ablation - the erosive process that reduces the size of glaciers
attrition, corrasion, detrition, abrasion - erosion by friction
beach erosion - the erosion of beaches
geologic process, geological process - (geology) a natural process whereby geological features are modified
deflation - (geology) the erosion of soil as a consequence of sand and dust and loose rocks being removed by the wind; "a constant deflation of the desert landscape"
planation - the process of erosion whereby a level surface is produced
soil erosion - the washing away of soil by the flow of water
2.erosion - condition in which the earth's surface is worn away by the action of water and wind
environmental condition - the state of the environment
3.erosion - a gradual decline of something; "after the accounting scandal there was an erosion of confidence in the auditors"
decline, diminution - change toward something smaller or lower
4.erosion - erosion by chemical action
chemical action, chemical change, chemical process - (chemistry) any process determined by the atomic and molecular composition and structure of the substances involved
pitting, indentation, roughness - the formation of small pits in a surface as a consequence of corrosion
rusting, rust - the formation of reddish-brown ferric oxides on iron by low-temperature oxidation in the presence of water

erosion

noun
1. disintegration, deterioration, corrosion, corrasion, wearing down or away, grinding down erosion of the river valleys
2. deterioration, wearing, undermining, destruction, consumption, weakening, spoiling, attrition, eating away, abrasion, grinding down, wearing down or away an erosion of moral standards
Translations
تأكُّل، تآكُل، تَعْرِيَه
eroze
erosionudhulning
eroosiokuluminensyöpyminen
erozija
erózió
veîrun, eyîing, uppblástur
erózia
aşın maerozyon

erosion

[ɪˈrəʊʒən] N
1. (Geol) → erosión f; [of metal] → corrosión f
2. (fig) → desgaste m

erosion

[ɪˈrəʊʒən] n
[soil, rock] → érosion f
[freedom, confidence] → érosion f

erosion

n (by water, glaciers, rivers) → Erosion f, → Abtragung f; (by acid) → Ätzung f; (fig, of love etc) → Schwinden nt; (of power, values, beliefs)Untergrabung f; (of authority)Unterminierung f; (of differentials)Aushöhlen nt; (of value)Abtragung f, → Untergrabung f; an erosion of confidence in the poundein Vertrauensverlust mor -schwund mdes Pfundes

erosion

[ɪˈrəʊʒn] n (see vb) → erosione f, corrosione f

erode

(iˈrəud) verb
to eat or wear away (metals etc); to destroy gradually. Acids erode certain metals; Water has eroded the rock; The individual's right to privacy is being eroded.
eˈrosion (-ʒən) noun

e·ro·sion

n. erosión, desgaste.

erosion

n erosión f
References in periodicals archive ?
In most places the boundary coincides with the erosional surface, often covered by a conglomerate that is composed of up to 30 cm large clay clasts (Fig.
When we add the soil improvement technologies to the soil we see big improvements in soil erosional resistance as well as in water holding capacity.
according to the cover and conglomerate layer in this boundary and the upper boundary of this sequence is SB1 due to erosional evidences or disconformity.
The new data show that at least two significant erosional episodes shaped the opening of the Strait.
Each one of the erosional episodes is indicated by the presence of an unconformity affected sedimentary material, which had already been consolidated into rock before subsequent layers of sediment were deposited.
It is a trans-gressive clastic sequence found throughout the basin as localised erosional remnants.
A headcut is the erosional process that occurs at abrupt vertical hydraulic drops.
The area is spectacular and the landform assemblage includes a wide range of erosional and depositional landscapes.
One can either retreat to the base of the ridge by retracing steps along the route already taken or one can clamber relatively easily down a gully at the deepest part of the erosional channel (about 50 metres west of the ascent route).
It also provides additional benefits, including:reducing the material washed downstream through erosional forces,reducing the flood risk to communities from flash flood events, as the flow is slowed and flood water retained in the floodplain,restoring forest landscapes such as streamside lawns which become lost to scrub as they become drier due to drainage,revitalising floodplain fertility which is an important benefit to the commoners of the New Forest whose animals are the architects of the Forest
A group of hills with basalt as resistant rock are formed due to different erosional and weathering processes, and they occupy the low area.