errant

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Related to errancies: inerrancy

errant

deviating from the proper course; straying; moving aimlessly: an errant breeze
Not to be confused with:
arrant – downright, thorough, unmitigated, notorious, utter, confirmed, flagrant: an arrant playboy
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

er·rant

 (ĕr′ənt)
adj.
1. Roving, especially in search of adventure: knights errant.
2. Failing to adhere to guidelines or moral standards: errant youngsters.
3.
a. Moving from the proper course or established limits: errant lambs.
b. Aimless or irregular in motion: an errant afternoon breeze.
c. Missing an intended target or recipient: an errant shot.

[Middle English erraunt, from Anglo-Norman, partly from Old French errer, to travel about (from Vulgar Latin *iterāre, from Latin iter, journey; see ei- in Indo-European roots) and partly from Old French errer, to err; see err.]

er′rant n.
er′rant·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

errant

(ˈɛrənt)
adj (often postpositive)
1. archaic or literary wandering in search of adventure
2. erring or straying from the right course or accepted standards
[C14: from Old French: journeying, from Vulgar Latin iterāre (unattested), from Latin iter journey; influenced by Latin errāre to err]
ˈerrantly adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

er•rant

(ˈɛr ənt)

adj.
1. deviating from the regular or proper course.
2. traveling, esp. in quest of adventure; roving adventurously.
3. moving in an aimless or lightly changing manner: an errant breeze.
[1300–50; Middle English erraunt < Middle French, Old French errant, present participle of errer, edrer to travel < Vulgar Latin *iterāre to journey]
er′rant•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.errant - straying from the right course or from accepted standards; "errant youngsters"
fallible - likely to fail or make errors; "everyone is fallible to some degree"
2.errant - uncontrolled motion that is irregular or unpredictable; "an errant breeze"
uncontrolled - not being under control; out of control; "the greatest uncontrolled health problem is AIDS"; "uncontrolled growth"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

errant

adjective sinning, offending, straying, wayward, deviant, erring, aberrant His errant son ran up debts of over £3000.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

errant

adjective
1. Traveling about, especially in search of adventure:
2. Straying from a proper course or standard:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

errant

[ˈerənt] ADJ (frm) → errante
see also knight C
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

errant

[ˈɛrənt] adj
(= unfaithful) [husband] → infidèle
(= paedophile) [priest] → dévoyé(e)
[son, child] → délinquant(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

errant

adj (= erring) wayssündig, verfehlt; husband etcuntreu; membersabtrünnig; (hum) Marxist, Freudianfehlgeleitet, auf Irrwegen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

errant

[ˈɛrənt] adj (frm) (wrong) → in errore; (unfaithful) → infedele
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
"Three products have one serious errancy and one has two serious errancies," said Agriculture Minister Gabriela Matena as cited by the Sme daily.Another two products had small errancies and three products completely met the recipe.
Tara Erraught's success as Nicklausse was more equivocal: singing and acting neatly in music with a lower tonal centre than she finds fully comfortable, she suffered more than anyone else from Sher's errancies. Oksana Volkova was the vocally so-so Giulietta in a generally undernourished musicodramatic version of Act III, but like everyone else she threw herself into the mix with enthusiastic conviction.
between Riven and Mortimer, see David Collings, Wordsworthian Errancies:
Rifkin's last two chapters, "Genealogies of Indianness: The Errancies of Peoplehood in Greg Sarris's Watermelon Night" and "Laboring in the City: Stereotype and Survival in Chrystos's Poetry" continue his investigations of the ways Two-Spirit writers imagine indigeneity.
Like Milne's books, the movie is partly an initiation into the delightful errancies of language, which fashions sense and nonsense out of the same materials.