errant

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Related to errancies: inerrancy

er·rant

 (ĕr′ənt)
adj.
1. Roving, especially in search of adventure: knights errant.
2. Failing to adhere to guidelines or moral standards: errant youngsters.
3.
a. Moving from the proper course or established limits: errant lambs.
b. Aimless or irregular in motion: an errant afternoon breeze.
c. Missing an intended target or recipient: an errant shot.

[Middle English erraunt, from Anglo-Norman, partly from Old French errer, to travel about (from Vulgar Latin *iterāre, from Latin iter, journey; see ei- in Indo-European roots) and partly from Old French errer, to err; see err.]

er′rant n.
er′rant·ly adv.

errant

(ˈɛrənt)
adj (often postpositive)
1. archaic or literary wandering in search of adventure
2. erring or straying from the right course or accepted standards
[C14: from Old French: journeying, from Vulgar Latin iterāre (unattested), from Latin iter journey; influenced by Latin errāre to err]
ˈerrantly adv

er•rant

(ˈɛr ənt)

adj.
1. deviating from the regular or proper course.
2. traveling, esp. in quest of adventure; roving adventurously.
3. moving in an aimless or lightly changing manner: an errant breeze.
[1300–50; Middle English erraunt < Middle French, Old French errant, present participle of errer, edrer to travel < Vulgar Latin *iterāre to journey]
er′rant•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.errant - straying from the right course or from accepted standards; "errant youngsters"
fallible - likely to fail or make errors; "everyone is fallible to some degree"
2.errant - uncontrolled motion that is irregular or unpredictable; "an errant breeze"
uncontrolled - not being under control; out of control; "the greatest uncontrolled health problem is AIDS"; "uncontrolled growth"

errant

adjective sinning, offending, straying, wayward, deviant, erring, aberrant His errant son ran up debts of over £3000.

errant

adjective
1. Traveling about, especially in search of adventure:
2. Straying from a proper course or standard:
Translations

errant

[ˈerənt] ADJ (frm) → errante
see also knight C

errant

[ˈɛrənt] adj
(= unfaithful) [husband] → infidèle
(= paedophile) [priest] → dévoyé(e)
[son, child] → délinquant(e)

errant

adj (= erring) wayssündig, verfehlt; husband etcuntreu; membersabtrünnig; (hum) Marxist, Freudianfehlgeleitet, auf Irrwegen

errant

[ˈɛrənt] adj (frm) (wrong) → in errore; (unfaithful) → infedele
References in periodicals archive ?
Another two products had small errancies and three products completely met the recipe.
Tara Erraught's success as Nicklausse was more equivocal: singing and acting neatly in music with a lower tonal centre than she finds fully comfortable, she suffered more than anyone else from Sher's errancies.
Rifkin's last two chapters, "Genealogies of Indianness: The Errancies of Peoplehood in Greg Sarris's Watermelon Night" and "Laboring in the City: Stereotype and Survival in Chrystos's Poetry" continue his investigations of the ways Two-Spirit writers imagine indigeneity.
Like Milne's books, the movie is partly an initiation into the delightful errancies of language, which fashions sense and nonsense out of the same materials.