eructation

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Related to eructations: belched

e·ruct

 (ĭ-rŭkt′)
tr. & intr.v. e·ruct·ed, e·ruct·ing, e·ructs
To belch.

[Latin ērūctāre : ē-, ex-, ex- + rūctāre, to belch; see reug- in Indo-European roots.]

e·ruc·ta′tion (ĭ-rŭk-tā′shən, ē′rŭk-) adj.
e·ruc′ta·tive (ĭ-rŭk′tə-tĭv) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

eructation

1. the process of belching.
2. that which is regurgitated in belching.
See also: Bodily Functions
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eructation - (of volcanos) pouring out fumes or lava (or a deposit so formed)
volcano, vent - a fissure in the earth's crust (or in the surface of some other planet) through which molten lava and gases erupt
activeness, activity, action - the state of being active; "his sphere of activity"; "he is out of action"
2.eructation - a reflex that expels gas noisily from the stomach through the moutheructation - a reflex that expels gas noisily from the stomach through the mouth
ejection, forcing out, expulsion, projection - the act of expelling or projecting or ejecting
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

eructation

n (hum)Aufstoßen nt; an eructationein Rülpser m (inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

e·ruc·ta·tion

n. eructación, eructo, acto de producir gas estomacal.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
"To eruct, Sancho," said Don Quixote, "means to belch, and that is one of the filthiest words in the Spanish language, though a very expressive one; and therefore nice folk have had recourse to the Latin, and instead of belch say eruct, and instead of belches say eructations; and if some do not understand these terms it matters little, for custom will bring them into use in the course of time, so that they will be readily understood; this is the way a language is enriched; custom and the public are all-powerful there."
For a moment nothing was to be seen but tumbled water, and--then there came belching up from below, with immense gulping noises, eructations of steam and air and petrol and fragments of canvas and woodwork and men.
The need for it may be recognised by the presence of indigestion with sour eructations, flatulence, and abdominal distension not relieved by eructation or the passage of flatus.
Dans la planche de droite (P87), la presque totale blancheur et les traits finement esquisses ont amenuise les eructations et traduisent un univers de repos.
as the tremors, rumblings and preliminary eructations that precede a
And if it gets weak, the stomach gets utterly disgusting with a smell of ordure, like a ripe boil or a rotten hen's egg, and then the eructations and the mouth reek with a stench like rotten ordure rising from the stomach so that the man has to be told, "Go away your breath smells." But when it grows plentiful, it holds the stench of ordure beneath the surface of the stomach, acting like the wooden lid of a privy.
There was no history of sour eructations, epigastric burning sensation and constipation.
Boris's burps might be amusing the first few times that you hear then, but, like Bryant's eructations all those years ago, grow tiresome because they suggest a man who wants attention simply for its own sake.