eruditely


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er·u·dite

 (ĕr′yə-dīt′, ĕr′ə-)
adj.
Having or showing great knowledge or learning. See Synonyms at learned.

[Middle English erudit, from Latin ērudītus, past participle of ērudīre, to instruct : ē-, ex-, ex- + rudis, rough, untaught; see rude.]

er′u·dite′ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.eruditely - with erudition; in an erudite manner; "he talked eruditely about Indian mythology"
Translations

eruditely

[ˈerʊdaɪtlɪ] ADVeruditamente

eruditely

advgelehrt

eruditely

[ˈɛruˌdaɪtlɪ] adveruditamente
References in periodicals archive ?
But as Francis Fukuyama so eruditely cautioned: "To truly esteem oneself means that one must be capable of feeling shame or self-disgust when one does not live up to a certain standard." Indeed, respect seems to have been consigned to a slang exclamation rather than the verb that we all once celebrated.
WE ALL love those who make us laugh Who release that hiss of steam That dispels our cares and woes Deletes our darkest dreams When a wizard waves his wand You'll hear that sound of glee As tummies ache and heads throw back In howls of hilarity As Sir Kenneth Arthur Dodd Eruditely explained it The tickle starts right in the middle And giggles up behind it Emitting that glorious gurgle of sound A hoot we all call laughter Gone our tensions and our tears As we grow daft and dafter Rows of teeth and grinning faces Chuckles everywhere As smiles abound and mirth breaks out And calls for encores rare Transported to a better place Friend and foe alike United in a different language Comedy - the luxury of life by Nuala Parsons, Liverpool
What this collection does, eruditely and provocatively, is set the political cat loose among the pigeons.
Winston Churchill in1955 condensed this most eruditely: "The first duty of a Member of Parliament is to do what he thinks in his faithful and disinterested judgement is right and necessary for the honour and safety of Great Britain.
Winston Churchill, pictured, condensed this most eruditely in 1955: "The first duty of a member of Parliament is to do what he thinks in his faithful and disinterested judgement is right and necessary for the honour and safety of Great Britain.
As Gary Neville eruditely observed, United backed Mourinho by extending his contract by a year in January as he flirted with Paris Saint-Germain, so they had to back him in the transfer market.
I marvel about the maturity, style and imagination so eruditely manifested in the writings of young columnists like Gideon Lasco, Michael Baylosis, Rivera, and contributors to Young Blood.
Although, as Memon explains eruditely, the PWM was the single-most powerful literary force in India at that point, it soon fell prey to its own ideological rigidity and dogmatism.
Extensive notes and an index round out this scholarly, heavily-researched, and eruditely written recontexualization of Detroit's history, highly recommended especially for public and college library American History collections.
In this book he eruditely acknowledges the qualities that the continent, despite its occasional slips into (self-) destruction, always managed to bring up: refined twists of cognition, breathtaking pinnacles of intellectual endeavors, enviable breadth in the grasp of tradition, together with its irreplaceable, soft and mellow irony.
(16) Zhang Longxi's [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (2015) most recent book, From Comparison to World Literature, is deeply invested in this tension, offering a methodologically resonant reading of world literature that eruditely blends global thematic resonances with locally distinct philologies.
First, positive obligations exist in other international human rights agreements, such as the ICCPR (118) and the ICESCR, (119) which are open for accession, and which many nations have eruditely signed.