escapement


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escapement

es·cape·ment

 (ĭ-skāp′mənt)
n.
1. A mechanism consisting in general of an escape wheel and an anchor, used especially in timepieces to control movement of the wheel and to provide periodic energy impulses to a pendulum or balance.
2. A mechanism, as in a typewriter, that controls the lateral movement of the carriage.
3.
a. An escape.
b. A means or way of escape.

escapement

(ɪˈskeɪpmənt)
n
1. (Horology) horology a mechanism consisting of an escape wheel and anchor, used in timepieces to provide periodic impulses to the pendulum or balance
2. (Mechanical Engineering) any similar mechanism that regulates movement, usually consisting of toothed wheels engaged by rocking levers
3. (Instruments) (in a piano) the mechanism that allows the hammer to clear the string after striking, so that the string can vibrate
4. (Civil Engineering) an overflow channel
5. rare an act or means of escaping

es•cape•ment

(ɪˈskeɪp mənt)

n.
1. the portion of a watch or clock that measures beats and controls the speed of the going train.
2. a mechanism for regulating the motion of a typewriter carriage, consisting of pawls and a toothed wheel or rack.
3. a mechanism in a piano that causes a hammer to fall back into rest position immediately after striking a string.
4. an act of escaping.
5. a way of escape; outlet.
[1730–40; calque of French échappement]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.escapement - mechanical device that regulates movementescapement - mechanical device that regulates movement
escape wheel - gear that engages a rocking lever
mechanical device - mechanism consisting of a device that works on mechanical principles
horologe, timepiece, timekeeper - a measuring instrument or device for keeping time

escapement

noun
The act or an instance of escaping, as from confinement or difficulty:
Slang: lam.
Translations

escapement

[ɪsˈkeɪpmənt] N [of watch] → escape m

escapement

n (of clock)Hemmung f
References in classic literature ?
Undoubtedly the travelers would still have to encounter a violent recoil after the complete escapement of the water; but the first shock would be almost entirely destroyed by this powerful spring.
The escapement, consisting of a cam-poised balance and a freely oscillating Lange balance spring, runs at a frequency of 21,600 semi-oscillations per hour.
After the bowl feeder, the collets were passed through a gravity chute and a singulator / escapement was provided which held back the collets while a single one was released on receipt of a signal from the customer.
The verge movement or escapement was based on a mechanism developed in the 14th century for large clocks such as those found in church towers.
Photograph: The Canterbury Auction Galleries Charles Frodsham watch incorporating a tourbillon escapement - an attempt to cancel out the effects of gravity on accuracy.
It also had an escapement made from silicon -- another first for Richemont.
The lightness of the new Lo Scienziato is truly remarkable, particularly considering its wealth of features: hours, minutes, small seconds, GMT with am/pm indication, a power reserve of six days with indication of the power remaining on the back, and a tourbillon escapement.
10) Apart from the device that let voyagers tell time under the sea, he also invented the gridiron pendulum, the bi-metallic strip (used in most modern kettles), a grasshopper escapement (a low-friction escapement for pendulum clocks) and an automatic form of manning power.
(2003) considered the increase in size selectivity observed by trawl fishermen during stormy periods, focused on the oscillation in trawl speed caused by vessel motion, and investigated its consequent effects on the opening of codend meshes and fish escapement. Likewise, Politis et al.
Featuring the proprietary Silicium anchor escapement crafted in-house at the Swiss manufacture, it boasts both COSC certification and the Ulysse Nardin certificate, a double guarantee of the highest performance standards.
Some fishers believe that fewer flatfish arrive on deck after dredge pause to be counted against ACL; however, this practice is weighed against potential scallop escapement. A further concern is that the practice is wasteful because of a lack of knowledge as to whether any managed bycatch had even been in the dredge before the retrieval pause.