escapement

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Related to escapements: Lever escapement, Deadbeat escapement
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escapement

es·cape·ment

 (ĭ-skāp′mənt)
n.
1. A mechanism consisting in general of an escape wheel and an anchor, used especially in timepieces to control movement of the wheel and to provide periodic energy impulses to a pendulum or balance.
2. A mechanism, as in a typewriter, that controls the lateral movement of the carriage.
3.
a. An escape.
b. A means or way of escape.

escapement

(ɪˈskeɪpmənt)
n
1. (Horology) horology a mechanism consisting of an escape wheel and anchor, used in timepieces to provide periodic impulses to the pendulum or balance
2. (Mechanical Engineering) any similar mechanism that regulates movement, usually consisting of toothed wheels engaged by rocking levers
3. (Instruments) (in a piano) the mechanism that allows the hammer to clear the string after striking, so that the string can vibrate
4. (Civil Engineering) an overflow channel
5. rare an act or means of escaping

es•cape•ment

(ɪˈskeɪp mənt)

n.
1. the portion of a watch or clock that measures beats and controls the speed of the going train.
2. a mechanism for regulating the motion of a typewriter carriage, consisting of pawls and a toothed wheel or rack.
3. a mechanism in a piano that causes a hammer to fall back into rest position immediately after striking a string.
4. an act of escaping.
5. a way of escape; outlet.
[1730–40; calque of French échappement]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.escapement - mechanical device that regulates movementescapement - mechanical device that regulates movement
escape wheel - gear that engages a rocking lever
mechanical device - mechanism consisting of a device that works on mechanical principles
horologe, timepiece, timekeeper - a measuring instrument or device for keeping time

escapement

noun
The act or an instance of escaping, as from confinement or difficulty:
Slang: lam.
Translations

escapement

[ɪsˈkeɪpmənt] N [of watch] → escape m

escapement

n (of clock)Hemmung f
References in classic literature ?
Undoubtedly the travelers would still have to encounter a violent recoil after the complete escapement of the water; but the first shock would be almost entirely destroyed by this powerful spring.
So the first thing that happened was that movements were replaced with anchor escapements capable of running for 30 hours.
He noted, "We are appealing to all potential investors to seize the opportunity and visit our town to explore the wide range of breathtaking escapements, parks and the hospitality of our people.
Late seventeenth century improvements to pendulums, balance springs and escapements brought greater accuracy and reliability to machines that could mark hours, minutes, and even seconds.
Early-timing Skeena coho escapements plunged from over 80,000 in the 1960s to under 20,000 in the late 1980s [Taylor 1993].
Most parent-year escapements were on track; any other stage in the freshwater or saltwater residence could have affected survival.
ruins of chaos, escapements of concrete slabs that for a thousand years
To do so, active and passive escapements were considered and from a specifically constructed decision matrix it was concluded that an active escapement would be much more ideal in this case.
Where space or access around the assembly machine is limited, vacuum-operated escapements can be supplied to deliver parts to the assembly machine while maintaining the required pitch.
Early clocks had fusee movements with verge escapements, and this early form continued until the end of the Georgian period when it was entirely superseded by the technically superior anchor escapement.
Carriage clock escapements are typically English lever - sometimes called 'ratchet tooth' escapements or 'cylinder' escapement.
We have contemporary fantasy, urban fantasy, horror mixed and matched, and mixed and matched in a variety of treatments and tones: Naomi Novik's dragons fighting in the Napoleonic wars, Jay Lake's escapements, alternate cosmologies of myriad sorts.