eschar

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es·char

 (ĕs′kär′)
n.
A dry scab or slough formed on the skin as a result of a burn or by the action of a corrosive or caustic substance.

[Middle English escare, from Old French; see scar1.]

eschar

(ˈɛskɑː)
n
(Medicine) a dry scab or slough, esp one following a burn or cauterization of the skin
[C16: from Late Latin eschara scab, from Greek eskhara hearth, pan of hot coals (which could inflict burns); see scar1]

es•char

(ˈɛs kɑr, -kər)

n.
a hard crust or scab, as from a burn.
[1375–1425; escare < Late Latin eschara < Greek eschára hearth, brazier]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eschar - a dry scab formed on the skin following a burn or cauterization of the skin
scab - the crustlike surface of a healing skin lesion
Translations

es·char

n. escara, costra de color oscuro que se forma en la piel después de una quemadura.

eschar

n escara, costra
References in periodicals archive ?
Rather, eschars, which are small patches of necrotic skin, are far more characteristic.
Infected persons commonly have fever, headache, conjunctival congestion, myalgia, lymphadenitis, rashes, and eschars with and without complications (2).
1, 2) Hence, we studied the distribution of eschars in paediatric Scrub typhus patients.
2) The finding of an eschar is often indicative of rickettsial infection; however, not all rickettsioses show eschars, and the absence of an eschar does not exclude rickettsial infection.
The SF group rickettsioses, most of which are transmitted by ticks, share many common features in clinical presentations, including (1) incubation periods of approximately one week; (2) flu-like prodromes of high fever, fatigue, headache, myalgia, arthralgia, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain (that may mimic acute appendicitis in RMSF); (3) spotty rashes within three to five days of fever onset; and (4) necrotic eschars at tick-bite sites.
The external auditory canal was filled with reddish soft tissue and greenish pus along with three blackish eschars over the scalp (Fig.
If a wound is maintained in an appropriately moist environment, hard eschars don't form.
Therefore, it is now recommended that surgical excision for spider bites be reserved for those patients whose eschars are stable; stability typically occurs in 6 to 10 weeks.
One patient had 3 eschars (buttocks, right hand, breast).
The distribution of eschars over the body overall is shown in table 1 and figl.
conorii infection; characteristic, but not consistent, distinguishing features are multiple eschars, tender regional lymphadenopathy, rashless illness, or only scattered and/or vesicular rash elements.
Late skin manifestations include dusky plaques with woody induration, which can evolve into irregular ulcers covered by thick, dark eschars that are exquisitely tender and lead to necrosis of the subcutaneous fat.