eschatology


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Related to eschatology: Dispensationalism

es·cha·tol·o·gy

 (ĕs′kə-tŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The branch of theology that is concerned with the end of the world or of humankind.
2. A belief or a doctrine concerning the ultimate or final things, such as death, the destiny of humanity, the Second Coming, or the Last Judgment.

[Greek eskhatos, last; see eghs in Indo-European roots + -logy.]

es·chat′o·log′i·cal (ĭ-skăt′l-ŏj′ĭ-kəl, ĕs′kə-tə-lŏj′-) adj.
es·chat′o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
es′cha·tol′o·gist n.

eschatology

(ˌɛskəˈtɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Theology) the branch of theology or biblical exegesis concerned with the end of the world
[C19: from Greek eskhatos last]
eschatological, ˌeschatoˈlogic adj
ˌeschatoˈlogically adv
ˌeschaˈtologist n

es•cha•tol•o•gy

(ˌɛs kəˈtɒl ə dʒi)

n.
1. any system of religious doctrines concerning last or final matters, as death, judgment, or an afterlife.
2. the branch of theology dealing with such matters.
[1835–45; < Greek éschato(s) last + -logy]
es•cha•to•log•i•cal (ˌɛs kə tlˈɒdʒ ɪ kəl, ɛˌskæt l-) adj.
es`cha•to•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
es`cha•tol′o•gist, n.

eschatology

Theology. any set of doctrines concerning flnal matters, as death, the judgment, afterlife, etc. — eschatological, adj. — eschatologist, n.
See also: End of the World
any set of doctrines concerning final matters, as death, the judgment, afterlife, etc. — eschatological, adj.eschatologist, n.
See also: Theology

eschatology

The branch of theology that deals with the end of the world.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eschatology - the branch of theology that is concerned with such final things as death and Last Judgment; Heaven and Hell; the ultimate destiny of humankind
theology, divinity - the rational and systematic study of religion and its influences and of the nature of religious truth
Translations
eschatologie
eskatologia
eschatologie

eschatology

[ˌeskəˈtɒlədʒɪ] N (Rel) → escatología f

eschatology

nEschatologie f
References in periodicals archive ?
Wheeler focuses very sharply on a particular area of theology (eschatology), trawling widely in all kinds of writing to produce a work of impressive scholarship which will be of great service to other researchers in the field but is unlikely to appeal much to the average undergraduate or lay reader, for whom it makes few allowances.
The 10 essays consider such topics as a dwelling place of demons: demonology and apocalypticism in the Dead Sea Scrolls, situating the Aramaic texts from Qumran: reconsidering their language and socio-historical settings, origins of evil in Genesis and the apocalyptic tradition, eschatology and time in 1 Enoch, and comparative eschatology: Paul's letters and the Dead Sea Scrolls.
Hope in Action: Subversive Eschatology in the Theology of Edward Schillebeeckx and Johann Baptist Metz.
As the Church year draws to a close and Advent approaches, the liturgical readings increasingly refer to the end times or to what theologians usually call eschatology. While including the meaning of end times, the word eschatology, says John O'Keefe, "captures the full spectrum of the Christian hope for the fulfillment of God's promises both in the here and now and in the age to come."
Statecraft and salvation; Wilsonian liberal internationalism as secularized eschatology.
Part II sketches the development of Christian beliefs beginning with eschatology and covering life after death, the human condition, salvation, Christology, pneumatology, emergence from Judaism, interaction with pagans, and the development of Christian orthodoxy.
Most of all, though, Leigh constructs his interpretive framework from recent essays by the philosopher John Davenport and the "Christian eschatology" of the theologians Zachary Hayes and Jurgen Moltmann, especially their interpretations of "Last Days" and "last things." More peripherally, Leigh draws from the theological writing of Wolfhart Pannenberg, Karl Rahner, and Teilhard de Chardin.
In this issue Edward Rommen, an Orthodox priest, theologian, and missiologist, leads with an article that demonstrates Christian interpretation of biblical eschatology at its least speculative.
This film has received mostly negative reviews from critics, but I have good reason to recommend it to those who are interested in views of eschatology in Jewish and Christian traditions.
This paper discusses the relationship between language and eschatology in the work of Emmanuel Levinas.
Reformation and modern theology, the sacraments of initiation, healing, and commitment, moral theology, eschatology, and much more.
In retrospect, eschatology has been part of my theological agenda since I began to reflect on theology, some fifty years ago.