escheat


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es·cheat

 (ĭs-chēt′)
n.
1. Reversion of land held under feudal tenure to the manor in the absence of legal heirs or claimants.
2. Law
a. Reversion of property to the state in the absence of legal heirs or claimants.
b. Property that has reverted to the state when no legal heirs or claimants exist.
intr. & tr.v. es·cheat·ed, es·cheat·ing, es·cheats Law
To revert or cause to revert by escheat.

[Middle English eschete, from Old French (from escheoir, to fall out) and from Anglo-Latin escheta, both from Vulgar Latin *excadēre, to fall out : Latin ex-, ex- + Latin cadere, to fall; see kad- in Indo-European roots.]

es·cheat′a·ble adj.

escheat

(ɪsˈtʃiːt) law
n
1. (Law) (in England before 1926) the reversion of property to the Crown in the absence of legal heirs
2. (Law) (in feudal times) the reversion of property to the feudal lord in the absence of legal heirs or upon outlawry of the tenant
3. (Law) the property so reverting
vb
(Law) to take (land) by escheat or (of land) to revert by escheat
[C14: from Old French eschete, from escheoir to fall to the lot of, from Late Latin excadere (unattested), from Latin cadere to fall]
esˈcheatable adj
esˈcheatage n

es•cheat

(ɛsˈtʃit)
Law. n.
1. the reverting of property to the state or, as in England, to the crown when there are no legal heirs.
2. the right to take property subject to escheat.
v.i.
3. (of property) to revert by escheat.
v.t.
4. to take or confiscate by escheat.
[1250–1300; Middle English eschete < Old French eschete, escheoite, feminine past participle of escheoir < Vulgar Latin *excadēre to fall to a person's share = Latin ex- ex-1 + cadere to fall (Vulgar Latin *cadēre)]
es•cheat′a•ble, adj.
es•cheat′or, n.

Escheat

 of lawyers—Lipton, 1970.

escheat


Past participle: escheated
Gerund: escheating

Imperative
escheat
escheat
Present
I escheat
you escheat
he/she/it escheats
we escheat
you escheat
they escheat
Preterite
I escheated
you escheated
he/she/it escheated
we escheated
you escheated
they escheated
Present Continuous
I am escheating
you are escheating
he/she/it is escheating
we are escheating
you are escheating
they are escheating
Present Perfect
I have escheated
you have escheated
he/she/it has escheated
we have escheated
you have escheated
they have escheated
Past Continuous
I was escheating
you were escheating
he/she/it was escheating
we were escheating
you were escheating
they were escheating
Past Perfect
I had escheated
you had escheated
he/she/it had escheated
we had escheated
you had escheated
they had escheated
Future
I will escheat
you will escheat
he/she/it will escheat
we will escheat
you will escheat
they will escheat
Future Perfect
I will have escheated
you will have escheated
he/she/it will have escheated
we will have escheated
you will have escheated
they will have escheated
Future Continuous
I will be escheating
you will be escheating
he/she/it will be escheating
we will be escheating
you will be escheating
they will be escheating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been escheating
you have been escheating
he/she/it has been escheating
we have been escheating
you have been escheating
they have been escheating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been escheating
you will have been escheating
he/she/it will have been escheating
we will have been escheating
you will have been escheating
they will have been escheating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been escheating
you had been escheating
he/she/it had been escheating
we had been escheating
you had been escheating
they had been escheating
Conditional
I would escheat
you would escheat
he/she/it would escheat
we would escheat
you would escheat
they would escheat
Past Conditional
I would have escheated
you would have escheated
he/she/it would have escheated
we would have escheated
you would have escheated
they would have escheated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.escheat - a reversion to the state (as the ultimate owner of property) in the absence of legal heirs
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
reversion - (law) an interest in an estate that reverts to the grantor (or his heirs) at the end of some period (e.g., the death of the grantee)
2.escheat - the property that reverts to the state
transferred possession, transferred property - a possession whose ownership changes or lapses
Translations
References in classic literature ?
The attention of the company was then directed, by a natural transition, to the little girl who had had the audacity to burn her hair off, and who, after receiving sundry small slaps and pushes from the more energetic of the ladies, was mercifully sent home: the ninepence, with which she was to have been rewarded, being escheated to the Kenwigs family.
Make sure to designate an escheat coordinator to work with the various departments that may generate potential UP, including, but not limited to, accounts payable, accounts receivable, payroll, and potentially marketing, human resources, and risk management.
Once a business has held the property for a statutorily mandated period (the dormancy period) without receiving communication from the owner, it becomes subject to escheat, and the holder has a responsibility to report the property to the appropriate state.
Rusty Bittermann's work on Prince Edward Island's escheat
The Connecticut Supreme Court cited The Dictionary of Real Estate Appraisal, sixth edition, definition of fee simple interest as "[a]bsolute ownership unencumbered by any other interest or estate, subject only to the limitations imposed by the governmental powers of taxation, eminent domain, police power, and escheat." The supreme court also cited the definition of leasehold interest as "[t]he right held by the lessee to use and occupy real estate for a stated term and under the conditions specified in the lease"; and the definition of leased fee interest as "[t]he ownership interest held by the lessor, which includes the right to receive the contract rent specified in the lease plus the reversionary right when the lease expires."
Cornwallis, through a sweeping settlement regime, granted proprietorial or effective ownership rights over land to the people who held it, doing away with practice of all land ownership being vested in the Sovereign and, even if a chunk of it was awarded as jagir to a grandee, its reversal to the crown by law of escheat once the noble died.
Brodett, BuCor said that since the money was not established to be proceeds from any crime, 'there is no legal basis to escheat them in favor of the government.'
The database also includes answers to questions on how cooperatives are treated under specific states' securities, antitrust, escheat, and unclaimed property laws.
The issue deals with state so-called "escheat laws," which require companies to turn over to the states funds that go unclaimed, mostly through bank accounts and insurance policies, but, in some cases from checks that were not cashed by their recipients.
490 (1993) (establishing the right to escheat unclaimed securities distributions).