escheat


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

es·cheat

 (ĭs-chēt′)
n.
1. Reversion of land held under feudal tenure to the manor in the absence of legal heirs or claimants.
2. Law
a. Reversion of property to the state in the absence of legal heirs or claimants.
b. Property that has reverted to the state when no legal heirs or claimants exist.
intr. & tr.v. es·cheat·ed, es·cheat·ing, es·cheats Law
To revert or cause to revert by escheat.

[Middle English eschete, from Old French (from escheoir, to fall out) and from Anglo-Latin escheta, both from Vulgar Latin *excadēre, to fall out : Latin ex-, ex- + Latin cadere, to fall; see kad- in Indo-European roots.]

es·cheat′a·ble adj.

escheat

(ɪsˈtʃiːt) law
n
1. (Law) (in England before 1926) the reversion of property to the Crown in the absence of legal heirs
2. (Law) (in feudal times) the reversion of property to the feudal lord in the absence of legal heirs or upon outlawry of the tenant
3. (Law) the property so reverting
vb
(Law) to take (land) by escheat or (of land) to revert by escheat
[C14: from Old French eschete, from escheoir to fall to the lot of, from Late Latin excadere (unattested), from Latin cadere to fall]
esˈcheatable adj
esˈcheatage n

es•cheat

(ɛsˈtʃit)
Law. n.
1. the reverting of property to the state or, as in England, to the crown when there are no legal heirs.
2. the right to take property subject to escheat.
v.i.
3. (of property) to revert by escheat.
v.t.
4. to take or confiscate by escheat.
[1250–1300; Middle English eschete < Old French eschete, escheoite, feminine past participle of escheoir < Vulgar Latin *excadēre to fall to a person's share = Latin ex- ex-1 + cadere to fall (Vulgar Latin *cadēre)]
es•cheat′a•ble, adj.
es•cheat′or, n.

Escheat

 of lawyers—Lipton, 1970.

escheat


Past participle: escheated
Gerund: escheating

Imperative
escheat
escheat
Present
I escheat
you escheat
he/she/it escheats
we escheat
you escheat
they escheat
Preterite
I escheated
you escheated
he/she/it escheated
we escheated
you escheated
they escheated
Present Continuous
I am escheating
you are escheating
he/she/it is escheating
we are escheating
you are escheating
they are escheating
Present Perfect
I have escheated
you have escheated
he/she/it has escheated
we have escheated
you have escheated
they have escheated
Past Continuous
I was escheating
you were escheating
he/she/it was escheating
we were escheating
you were escheating
they were escheating
Past Perfect
I had escheated
you had escheated
he/she/it had escheated
we had escheated
you had escheated
they had escheated
Future
I will escheat
you will escheat
he/she/it will escheat
we will escheat
you will escheat
they will escheat
Future Perfect
I will have escheated
you will have escheated
he/she/it will have escheated
we will have escheated
you will have escheated
they will have escheated
Future Continuous
I will be escheating
you will be escheating
he/she/it will be escheating
we will be escheating
you will be escheating
they will be escheating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been escheating
you have been escheating
he/she/it has been escheating
we have been escheating
you have been escheating
they have been escheating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been escheating
you will have been escheating
he/she/it will have been escheating
we will have been escheating
you will have been escheating
they will have been escheating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been escheating
you had been escheating
he/she/it had been escheating
we had been escheating
you had been escheating
they had been escheating
Conditional
I would escheat
you would escheat
he/she/it would escheat
we would escheat
you would escheat
they would escheat
Past Conditional
I would have escheated
you would have escheated
he/she/it would have escheated
we would have escheated
you would have escheated
they would have escheated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.escheat - a reversion to the state (as the ultimate owner of property) in the absence of legal heirs
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
reversion - (law) an interest in an estate that reverts to the grantor (or his heirs) at the end of some period (e.g., the death of the grantee)
2.escheat - the property that reverts to the state
transferred possession, transferred property - a possession whose ownership changes or lapses
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Brodett, BuCor said that since the money was not established to be proceeds from any crime, 'there is no legal basis to escheat them in favor of the government.
The California audit found that insurers had an "asymmetric" policy regarding its products, moving quickly to stop payments on variable annuities with lifetime guaranty payment provisions, but not acting quickly to determine whether life insurance policyholders had died and move to find the beneficiaries or turn the money over to the statement through so-called escheat laws.
For instance, certain states have taken the position on audit of retailers and other card issuers that promotional instruments may be subject to escheat laws, which means the issuer may be on the hook to pay the state cash for instruments that it handed out to recipients without the receipt of any cash consideration.
TransAmerican Asset Servicing Group is a 20-year-old company that offers a range of unclaimed property consulting services that include search and location, escheat management, risk mitigation, and regulatory compliance.
Upon examination, a secondary state's unclaimed property auditor may attempt to escheat funds exempt from escheatment by the primary state.
If the purchaser's home state is unknown, or if that state does not escheat gift cards, the state where the business is incorporated can enforce its escheatment rules.
Additional challenges include the timing for remitting the various classes of unclaimed property, the amount to escheat, the jurisdiction to which the funds must be remitted, and associated record-keeping requirements.
Property is abandoned after a period of dormancy, which is defined by each state and state escheat laws vary.
The UPL [Unclaimed Property Law] is not a permanent or 'true' escheat statute.
The lawsuit was filed almost a decade after Staples said in a voluntary disclosure that it owed about $137,000 in past due escheat payments.
Few did, and the result was the escheat movement: a multi-generational struggle to revoke these grants and transfer title to the tenant farm families who worked the land.
In the face of increasing fiscal challenges, states have worked to increase their collection of unclaimed property via new escheat legislation that appears to bear little or no relation to protecting the interests of owners.