escheat

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es·cheat

 (ĭs-chēt′)
n.
1. Reversion of land held under feudal tenure to the manor in the absence of legal heirs or claimants.
2. Law
a. Reversion of property to the state in the absence of legal heirs or claimants.
b. Property that has reverted to the state when no legal heirs or claimants exist.
intr. & tr.v. es·cheat·ed, es·cheat·ing, es·cheats Law
To revert or cause to revert by escheat.

[Middle English eschete, from Old French (from escheoir, to fall out) and from Anglo-Latin escheta, both from Vulgar Latin *excadēre, to fall out : Latin ex-, ex- + Latin cadere, to fall; see kad- in Indo-European roots.]

es·cheat′a·ble adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

escheat

(ɪsˈtʃiːt) law
n
1. (Law) (in England before 1926) the reversion of property to the Crown in the absence of legal heirs
2. (Law) (in feudal times) the reversion of property to the feudal lord in the absence of legal heirs or upon outlawry of the tenant
3. (Law) the property so reverting
vb
(Law) to take (land) by escheat or (of land) to revert by escheat
[C14: from Old French eschete, from escheoir to fall to the lot of, from Late Latin excadere (unattested), from Latin cadere to fall]
esˈcheatable adj
esˈcheatage n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

es•cheat

(ɛsˈtʃit)
Law. n.
1. the reverting of property to the state or, as in England, to the crown when there are no legal heirs.
2. the right to take property subject to escheat.
v.i.
3. (of property) to revert by escheat.
v.t.
4. to take or confiscate by escheat.
[1250–1300; Middle English eschete < Old French eschete, escheoite, feminine past participle of escheoir < Vulgar Latin *excadēre to fall to a person's share = Latin ex- ex-1 + cadere to fall (Vulgar Latin *cadēre)]
es•cheat′a•ble, adj.
es•cheat′or, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Escheat

 of lawyers—Lipton, 1970.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

escheat


Past participle: escheated
Gerund: escheating

Imperative
escheat
escheat
Present
I escheat
you escheat
he/she/it escheats
we escheat
you escheat
they escheat
Preterite
I escheated
you escheated
he/she/it escheated
we escheated
you escheated
they escheated
Present Continuous
I am escheating
you are escheating
he/she/it is escheating
we are escheating
you are escheating
they are escheating
Present Perfect
I have escheated
you have escheated
he/she/it has escheated
we have escheated
you have escheated
they have escheated
Past Continuous
I was escheating
you were escheating
he/she/it was escheating
we were escheating
you were escheating
they were escheating
Past Perfect
I had escheated
you had escheated
he/she/it had escheated
we had escheated
you had escheated
they had escheated
Future
I will escheat
you will escheat
he/she/it will escheat
we will escheat
you will escheat
they will escheat
Future Perfect
I will have escheated
you will have escheated
he/she/it will have escheated
we will have escheated
you will have escheated
they will have escheated
Future Continuous
I will be escheating
you will be escheating
he/she/it will be escheating
we will be escheating
you will be escheating
they will be escheating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been escheating
you have been escheating
he/she/it has been escheating
we have been escheating
you have been escheating
they have been escheating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been escheating
you will have been escheating
he/she/it will have been escheating
we will have been escheating
you will have been escheating
they will have been escheating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been escheating
you had been escheating
he/she/it had been escheating
we had been escheating
you had been escheating
they had been escheating
Conditional
I would escheat
you would escheat
he/she/it would escheat
we would escheat
you would escheat
they would escheat
Past Conditional
I would have escheated
you would have escheated
he/she/it would have escheated
we would have escheated
you would have escheated
they would have escheated
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.escheat - a reversion to the state (as the ultimate owner of property) in the absence of legal heirs
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
reversion - (law) an interest in an estate that reverts to the grantor (or his heirs) at the end of some period (e.g., the death of the grantee)
2.escheat - the property that reverts to the state
transferred possession, transferred property - a possession whose ownership changes or lapses
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
CPAs can assist clients in assuring that they are compliant with their unclaimed filing obligations, and assist them in returning property to its rightful owner or escheating it, through timely compliance, to the appropriate jurisdiction.
In doing so, he once again ignores the theories and evidence advanced by Bruce Benson and other contributors to the public-choice and Austrian literatures documenting the parochial benefits to the Crown of substituting penalties for violating the king's peace (fines escheating to the public treasury and incarceration) for restitution paid by a lawbreaker to his victim for violating the (private) peace.
"The ACLI continues to believe it is in everyone's best interest -- regulators, consumers and insurers -- to have clear and consistent laws from state-to-state specifying an insurer's obligations to its customers when an insured's death has occurred but a claim has not been filed, along with the protocols for escheating unclaimed benefits to the state," said Whit Cornman, an ACLI spokesman.