espionage


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Related to espionage: Corporate espionage, Espionage Act

es·pi·o·nage

 (ĕs′pē-ə-näzh′, -nĭj)
n.
The practice of spying or of using spies to obtain secret information, especially regarding a government or business.

[French espionnage, from espionner, to spy, from Old French espion, spy, from Old Italian spione, of Germanic origin; see spek- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

espionage

(ˈɛspɪəˌnɑːʒ; ˌɛspɪəˈnɑːʒ; ˈɛspɪənɪdʒ)
n
1. the systematic use of spies to obtain secret information, esp by governments to discover military or political secrets
2. the act or practice of spying
[C18: from French espionnage, from espionner to spy, from espion spy, from Old Italian spione, of Germanic origin; compare German spähen to spy]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

es•pi•o•nage

(ˈɛs pi əˌnɑʒ, -nɪdʒ, ˌɛs pi əˈnɑʒ)

n.
1. the act or practice of spying.
2. the use of spies by a government to discover the military and political secrets of other nations.
3. the use of spies by a corporation or the like to acquire the plans or technical knowledge of a competitor: industrial espionage.
[1785–95; < French espionnage, Middle French espionage=espionn(er) to spy (derivative of espion spy < Italian spione]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

espionage

The act of obtaining, delivering, transmitting, communicating, or receiving information about the national defense with an intent, or reason to believe, that the information may be used to the injury of the United States or to the advantage of any foreign nation. Espionage is a violation of 18 United States Code 792-798 and Article 106, Uniform Code ofMilitary Justice. See also counterintelligence.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.espionage - the systematic use of spies to get military or political secretsespionage - the systematic use of spies to get military or political secrets
undercover work, spying - the act of keeping a secret watch for intelligence purposes
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

espionage

noun spying, intelligence, surveillance, counter-intelligence, undercover work The authorities have arrested several people suspected of espionage.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
تَجَسُّس، جاسوسِيَّهجَاسُوسِيَّة
špionáž
spionage
vakoilu
špijunaža
kémkedés
njósnir
スパイ行為
첩보 활동
šnipinėjimasšpionažas
spiegošana
špionáž
spionage
จารกรรม
hoạt động gián điệp

espionage

[ˌespɪəˈnɑːʒ] Nespionaje m
industrial espionageespionaje m industrial
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

espionage

[ˈɛspɪənɑːʒ] nespionnage m industrial espionage
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

espionage

nSpionage f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

espionage

[ˌɛspɪəˈnɑːʒ] nspionaggio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

espionage

(ˈespiənaːʒ) noun
the activity of spying. He has never been involved in espionage.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

espionage

جَاسُوسِيَّة špionáž spionage Spionage κατασκοπεία espionaje vakoilu espionnage špijunaža spionaggio スパイ行為 첩보 활동 spionage spionasje szpiegostwo espionagem шпионаж spionage จารกรรม casusluk hoạt động gián điệp 间谍
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
He'd have liked to have slipped away secret, but we was keeping him under espionage too crisp for that, so he has to tell us.
Yet how could a man be safer from espionage than he!
"Only a few weeks after the war began," Thsomson continued thoughtfully, "two French generals, four or five colonels, and over twenty junior and non-commissioned officers were court-martialled for espionage. The French have been on the lookout for that sort of thing.
Espionage is a base thing, but--what have I to do with that?
But it is time that we should connect with this epoch of the operations of the one, and the espionage of the other, the visit which Cornelius de Witt came to pay to his native town.
"The system of espionage here," he remarked, "is painfully primitive.
"Who and what are you?" demanded Villefort, turning over a pile of papers, containing information relative to the prisoner, that a police agent had given to him on his entry, and that, already, in an hour's time, had swelled to voluminous proportions, thanks to the corrupt espionage of which "the accused" is always made the victim.
To you it may seem that my conviction was the re-sult of an overwrought imagination, or to the actual reality of the prying eyes of the little monkeys or the curious ones of the birds; but there is a difference which I cannot explain between the sensation of casual observation and studied espionage. A sheep might gaze at you without transmitting a warning through your sub-jective mind, because you are in no danger from a sheep.
On several occasions Tarzan saw the mysterious Arab, and once again he had been exchanging words with Lieutenant Gernois; but no amount of espionage or shadowing by Tarzan revealed the Arab's lodgings, the location of which Tarzan was anxious to ascertain.
It's all very well to shrug your shoulders, but when there are eighteen arrests within one week on a charge of espionage, there must be something up."
She put the door gently too, slipped off her snowy shoes, untied her hat, and was proceeding, unconscious of my espionage, to lay aside her mantle, when I suddenly rose and revealed myself.
It is like espionage to bring a test to bear upon another, is it not?