esplanade

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es·pla·nade

 (ĕs′plə-näd′, -nād′)
n.
A flat open stretch of pavement or grass, especially one designed as a promenade along a shore.

[French, from Italian spianata, from spianare, to level, from Latin explānāre, to make plain; see explain.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

esplanade

(ˌɛspləˈneɪd; -ˈnɑːd)
n
1. a long open level stretch of ground for walking along, esp beside the seashore. Compare promenade1
2. (Fortifications) an open area in front of a fortified place, in which attackers are exposed to the defenders' fire
[C17: from French, from Old Italian spianata, from spianare to make level, from Latin explānāre; see explain]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

es•pla•nade

(ˈɛs pləˌnɑd, -ˌneɪd, ˌɛs pləˈnɑd, -ˈneɪd)

n.
an open level space, esp. one serving for public walks or drives along a shore.
[1675–85; < French < Italian spianata, < Latin explānāre to level]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.esplanade - a long stretch of open level ground (paved or grassy) for walking beside the seashoreesplanade - a long stretch of open level ground (paved or grassy) for walking beside the seashore
mall, promenade - a public area set aside as a pedestrian walk
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
رَحْبَه، مَيْدان
esplanadepromenade
EsplanadePromenade
opiî svæîi á jafnsléttu
aikštelė
esplanādepastaigu vieta
esplanáda
gezinti yolu

esplanade

[ˌespləˈneɪd] Npaseo m marítimo (Mil) → explanada f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

esplanade

[ˌɛspləˈneɪd] nesplanade f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

esplanade

n(Strand)promenade f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

esplanade

[ˌɛspləˈneɪd] nlungomare m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

esplanade

(espləˈneid) noun
a level space for walking or driving especially at the seaside. Our hotel is on the esplanade and overlooks the sea.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Mathias was taken within twelve hours from his cell, then led to the jailer's lodge, where he was registered as leaving Loewestein, then taken to the Esplanade, from which there is a very fine prospect over a wide expanse of country.
Cornelius counted the steps which led to the Esplanade, regretting that he had not asked the guard how many there were of them, which the man, in his official complaisance, would not have failed to tell him.
On reaching the Esplanade, he bravely looked about for the guards who were to be his executioners, and in reality saw a dozen soldiers assembled.
The Pontelliers possessed a very charming home on Esplanade Street in New Orleans.
Baisemeaux led the way down several steps which conducted to a sort of esplanade; thence they arrived at the draw-bridge, where the sentinels on duty received the governor with the proper honors.
A white horse is in waiting for you behind the esplanade!"
It was strongly secured by a palisade on each side, as was the esplanade in front of the pavilions, and the whole was guarded by men-at-arms.
Later, after dinner, meeting both ladies on the esplanade, he gleaned further information--to wit, that her first name was Mary, that her aunt was glad to make his acquaintance, liked Marvis Bay but preferred Trouville, and thought it was getting a little chilly and would go indoors.
It was the unmovable expression, the faded stare she used to see on the esplanade whenever walking by his side hand in hand she raised her eyes to his face--while she chattered, chattered.
I walked in the sunshine, disregarding it, and in the shade of the big trees on the esplanade without enjoying it.
They advanced about thirty paces, and then stopped at a small esplanade surrounded with rocks, in which seats had been cut, not unlike sentry-boxes.