establishable

establishable

(ɪˈstæblɪʃəbəl)
adj
able to be established or secured
References in periodicals archive ?
establishable age between twenty and thirty" (777).
establishable utopian world, making such a utopian world fundamentally
(30) The footnote accompanying this statement again points us to passages in Spinoza's Critique of Religion, this time to passages arguing that the positive or scientific mind rests on a "will," not on an establishable progress of consciousness, at least in the case of the Spinozistic Enlightenment.
Within a perspective such as representational nativism (Pinker, 1994), what prevents an individual with MR from developing fully grammatical language in the first place is the lack of preservation or transcription (not clearly established nor perhaps establishable) of the (supposed) genetic blueprint for grammar.
If this occurs, it is usually the case that an establishable paradigm will have developed that will have associated with it recognizable patterns of behaviour.
If the foregoing criticisms are correct then even if Peacocke could somehow single out a priori the Natural Selection explanation as the one that best reduces complexity with respect to the occurrence of perceptual states (10) (premise (5)), the inference to its being the most likely (premise (6)), will be mediated by (4), which itself depends on (2), and, as we have argued, he hasn't shown (2) to be establishable a priori.
The bibliography of his writings shows that his range is much wider than runology, though that is itself a wide-ranging subject on which not many scholars have written with such good sense and care for establishable truth as he.
It is only to say that its actual truth is establishable in a special way.
The present a priori advantage, if it is one, is simply an advantage of any a priori statement over any empirical one: the former, but not the latter, is establishable with certainty and cannot be refuted by experience.
To find "heterogeneity" in musical identity is an easily establishable matter in the case of much jazz, more so today in light of the proliferation of digital sampling in hip hop and the numerous, overlapping, and often ambivalently contradictory texts enacted in hip-hop performance.(1) That bebop was largely built out of what James Patrick in 1975 called "melodic contrafacts" expropriated from popular tunes of the early 1940s is a virtual given these days:
Or, to pose a related question from a slightly different perspective, is Jesus' resurrection part of the historically establishable ground of faith, or is it to be classified as an object of faith which is not part of that historically recognizable foundation?(78)