estoppel


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es·top·pel

 (ĕ-stŏp′əl)
n. Law
A bar that prevents a person from presenting evidence contradicting a certain established fact.

[Obsolete French estouppail, from Old French estouper, to stop up, from Vulgar Latin *stuppāre; see stop.]

estoppel

(ɪˈstɒpəl)
n
(Law) law a rule of evidence whereby a person is precluded from denying the truth of a statement of facts he has previously asserted. See also conclusion
[C16: from Old French estoupail plug, from estoper to stop up; see estop]

es•top•pel

(ɛˈstɒp əl)

n.
a legal bar that prevents a person from asserting a claim or fact that is inconsistent with a position that the person has previously taken.
[1575–85; < Middle French estoupail stopper]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.estoppel - a rule of evidence whereby a person is barred from denying the truth of a fact that has already been settled
rule of evidence - (law) a rule of law whereby any alleged matter of fact that is submitted for investigation at a judicial trial is established or disproved
Translations

estoppel

n (Jur) → rechtshemmender Einwand
References in periodicals archive ?
Their topics include restitution, contract formation including offer and acceptance, promissory estoppel, remedies--selected issues, constructive conditions of exchange, rights of third parties, and the proper scope of contract law.
Focus: Promissory Estoppel Firestone Financial sued John Meyer as guarantor of defaulted loans.
The principle of collateral estoppel means simply that when an issue of ultimate fact has once been determined by a valid and final judgment, that issue cannot again be litigated between the same parties in any future lawsuit.
When weighing the equities at issue in this case, it is better, I respectfully conclude, that we apply collateral estoppel than require defendant to defend himself a second time on a charge arising from an identical fact pattern, Flaherty stated.
Generally, the purpose of collateral estoppel is to save time, money, effort and frustration for all parties involved by preventing the relitigation of issues that have been actually and necessarily determined in a prior proceeding involving the same parties.
THE recent case of Moore v Moore (decided in the High Court on August 19, 2016) highlights the nuances in the operation of the principle of proprietary estoppel and the need for people to be very clear on what they are (or are not) promising to others.
When the America Invents Act (AIA) first proposed post-grant proceedings at the USPTO, many thought its estoppel provisions might deter would-be petitioners.
Summary: When the America Invents Act (AIA) first proposed post-grant proceedings at the USPTO, many thought its estoppel provisions might deter would-be petitioners.
Spain, EXCELENTSIMO AYUNTAMIENTO DE MURCIA announced tender for Subsidiaries of works, restoration of urban legality, cleaning and / or solar fencing and conservation of duty under estoppel of the department of planning, environment and huerta executions.
The Tax Court held that Blagaich had failed to prove that collateral estoppel applied to the $343,819 in cash and property and that whether they were nontaxable gifts remained a question of fact for trial.
Equitable lien claims are typically based on theories of either equitable estoppel or unjust enrichment.
Equitable estoppel and in particular estoppel arising from representations which are relied upon to the detriment of a party to whom they were made; and