estragon


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estragon

(ˈɛstrəˌɡɒn)
n
(Plants) another name for tarragon
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.estragon - aromatic perennial of southeastern Russiaestragon - aromatic perennial of southeastern Russia
estragon, tarragon - fresh leaves (or leaves preserved in vinegar) used as seasoning
artemisia - any of various composite shrubs or herbs of the genus Artemisia having aromatic green or greyish foliage
2.estragon - fresh leaves (or leaves preserved in vinegar) used as seasoning
herb - aromatic potherb used in cookery for its savory qualities
Artemisia dracunculus, estragon, tarragon - aromatic perennial of southeastern Russia
Translations

estragon

n (Bot) → Estragon m
References in periodicals archive ?
Part of the waiting time is filled by an exchange of lines of no significance, and part of the time is devoted to playacting: Vladimir and Estragon present a quarrel that ends in reconciliation, or they represent Lucky and Pozzo.
During a series of workshops, children were asked to complete a number of tasks, from designing posters advertising the play to discussing the relationship between Vladimir and Estragon, the two main characters.
The story focuses on tramps Vladimir and Estragon who are waiting for someone.
Emphasizing the immediate circularity of the situation in which Vladimir and Estragon find themselves, the poem also echoes the defects of linguistic communication witnessed in The Capital of the Ruins.
The prison as Melies had designed it in 1899 looked as if waiting for Vladimir and Estragon to step on to recite their lines.
Main characters Estragon and Vladimir spend the entire play waiting for salvation in the shape of friend Godot, whom many take to stand for God.
Simon Armstrong as Vladimir,and John Cording as Estragon,in Waiting For; Godot Picture: STACEY ROBERTS
As Estragon reminds us in Beckett's first act, one thing really never seems to change: "People are bloody ignorant apes.
Now, unless the people doing the waiting are named Vladimir and Estragon, extended waiting on display is, well, turgid.
When Estragon apologizes to Pozzo for having mistaken him for Godot by saying 'We're not from these parts, Sir', Pozzo retorts:
To support this idea, Weitz provides three "case studies" at the end of one chapter, where he draws upon theater reviews to relate the portrayals of certain characters, such as a production of Moliere's Don Juan that reversed the roles between servant and master, and Bert Lahr's incorporation of a "broad comic style and instinct for music-hall repartee" (169) in his depiction of Estragon.
It is, in a way, as essential as all drama, from the ritual to the burlesque - trying to make sense of life, but always bewildered by it - that draws here on archetypal pairings from Laurel and Hardy to Bill and Ben by way of Vladimir and Estragon.