ethiops


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Related to ethiops: Ethiops martial

ethiops

(ˈiːθɪɒps)
n
(Elements & Compounds) chem obsolete a dark-coloured chemical compound
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
Let anti-masques not be long; they have been commonly of fools, satyrs, baboons, wild-men, antics, beasts, sprites, witches, Ethiops, pigmies, turquets, nymphs, rustics, Cupids, statuas moving, and the like.
"Ethiops", I understand, means black people in Greek, and "Ethiopia" is their land.
In the poem "The Pattern," the river becomes, above all other considerations, an instrument for the daughter to daydream about her escape from the restrictive patriarchal patterns which her mother dictates: "I'd watch / the Liffey for hours pulsing to the sea / and the coming and going of ships, / certain that one day it would carry me / to Zanzibar, Bombay, the Land of the Ethiops" (19).
that the first race of Persians and Indians, to whom we may add the Romans and Greeks, the Goths and the old Egyptians or Ethiops, originally spoke the same language and professed the same popular faith", (qtd in Clarke 1997: 58) suggesting that Iran was the common place of origin and thus asking to exercise more caution in accepting the biblical account asserted by Bryant in his Analysis.
The Greeks introduced the word "Ethiops", meaning "burnt-faces".
The Ethiops, whether collectively or in the guises of Prester John and Caspar, one of the magi, were admired.
Because foreign territory had become identified with blackness, however, sexual otherness often ended up on this side of the binary divide, as well: In some contexts, both African and English women were "Ethiops." Likewise, feared populations could be labeled "black," whether they were American, Indian, Spanish, Irish, or Welsh.
Yet Anne did not actually write the masque, and Jonson ultimately assigns the power "to blanch an Ethiop" to the sun, standing for James.
(Although some early modern writers make a distinction between warlike "white" Moors, savage "blackamoors," and Christian "Ethiops," they frequently use the terms interchangeably.) Since a rich body of critical work over the past decade (by Kim Hall, Joyce Green MacDonald, Arthur Little, and Mary Floyd-Wilson, among others) has addressed these associations of Moorishness, heat, and intensity, and I myself have done so elsewhere, I need revisit them only briefly here.
Lysander, under the influence of Puck's mischief, reviles dark Hermia as "an Ethiop," a "tawny Tartar," and Hermia in her turn traduces tall Helena as a "painted maypole" around which both young men dance attendance (3.2.257, 263, 296).
Newman, "'And wash the Ethiop white': Femininity and .the Monstrous in Othello," Critical Essays in Shakespeare's Othello, ed.