ethnarchy


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eth·narch

 (ĕth′närk′)
n.
The ruler of a province or people.

[Greek ethnarkhēs : ethnos, nation; see ethnic + -arkhēs, -arch.]

eth′nar′chy n.

ethnarchy

the rank and position of a governor of a province or people. — ethnarch, n.
See also: Government
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References in periodicals archive ?
Before independence, our leadership were the priests who made up what was called the ethnarchy, hence the reference, at least before independence, to every archbishop as the ethnarch.
Is it a fact that the Republika Srpska refuses to co-operate in the Federation, running its own "ethnarchy," making it all but unthinkable for a Bosnian woman, even if her home is still standing and available, to return to Srebrenica?
He is the son of an Ethnarchy councillor who is himself now in detention.
Following the principles of sociality--or solidarity, and hypotactics--or subsidiarity, the liberty and perfection of individuals is proportionally enhanced, in Taparelli's view, with the integration into ever larger human communities, indeed up to the eventual global society of peoples, the democratic ethnarchy, (ST, 714; CE, 120, II) which he foresaw as the fulfillment of the immutable laws of nature.
During the past few years, observers in America and Europe have written of "The Coming Anarchy" (Kaplan 1994), "Ethnarchy and Ethnoanarchism" (Tamas 1996), Pandaemonium (Moynihan 1993), and The Balkanization of the West (Mestrovic 1994).
Tamas, "Ethnarchy and Ethno-Anarchism," Social Research 63 (Spring, 1996): 172.
While Akel went along with the Ethnarchy and became a fiery supporter of enosis, the KKK took a stand in favour of independence and therefore against union with Greece.
Therefore, we are obliged to recommend that no secret should be confided to him either by the Ethnarchy or by the Greek Consulate.