ethnic

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ethnic

relating to a religious, racial, or cultural group
Not to be confused with:
ethic – system of moral principles or values

eth·nic

 (ĕth′nĭk)
adj.
1.
a. Of, relating to, or characteristic of a group of people sharing a common cultural or national heritage and often sharing a common language or religion.
b. Being a member of a particular ethnic group, especially belonging to a national group by heritage or culture but residing outside its national boundaries: ethnic Hungarians living in northern Serbia.
c. Of, relating to, or distinctive of members of such a group: ethnic restaurants; ethnic art.
2. Archaic Relating to a people not Christian or Jewish.
n.
A member of a particular ethnic group, especially one who maintains the language or customs of the group.

[Middle English, heathen, from Late Latin ethnicus, from Greek ethnikos, from ethnos, people, nation; see s(w)e- in Indo-European roots.]
Word History: When it is said in a Middle English text written before 1400 that a part of a temple fell down and "mad a gret distruccione of ethnykis," one wonders which ethnicity was singled out for death. The word ethnic in this context, however, means "gentile," coming as it does from the Greek adjective ethnikos, meaning "national, foreign, gentile." The adjective is derived from the noun ethnos, "people, nation, foreign people," that in the plural phrase ta ethnē meant "foreign nations." In translating the Hebrew Scriptures into Greek, this phrase was used for Hebrew gōyīm, "gentiles"; hence the sense of the noun in the Middle English quotation. The current sense of the word emerged in the 19th century, probably under the influence of other words going back to Greek ethnos, such as ethnography and ethnology.

ethnic

(ˈɛθnɪk) or

ethnical

adj
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) relating to or characteristic of a human group having racial, religious, linguistic, and certain other traits in common
2. (Anthropology & Ethnology) relating to the classification of mankind into groups, esp on the basis of racial characteristics
3. (Sociology) denoting or deriving from the cultural traditions of a group of people: the ethnic dances of Slovakia.
4. characteristic of another culture: the ethnic look; ethnic food.
n
chiefly US and Austral a member of an ethnic group, esp a minority group
[C14 (in the senses: heathen, Gentile): from Late Latin ethnicus, from Greek ethnikos, from ethnos race]
ˈethnically adv
ethnicity n
Usage: Referring to a person as an ethnic is broadly acceptable in the US, Australia, and Canada, but could well cause offence in the UK and elsewhere

eth•nic

(ˈɛθ nɪk)

adj.
1. pertaining to or characteristic of a people, esp. a group (eth′nic group′) sharing a common and distinctive culture, religion, language, etc.
2. being a member of an ethnic group, esp. a group that is a minority within a larger society: ethnic Chinese in San Francisco.
3. belonging to or deriving from the cultural traditions of a people or country: ethnic dances.
4. Obs. pagan; heathen.
n.
5. a member of an ethnic group.
[1325–75; ethnik heathen < Late Latin ethnicus < Greek ethnikós. See ethno-, -ic]
eth′ni•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ethnic - a person who is a member of an ethnic group
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Adj.1.ethnic - denoting or deriving from or distinctive of the ways of living built up by a group of people; "influenced by ethnic and cultural ties"- J.F.Kennedy; "ethnic food"
social - living together or enjoying life in communities or organized groups; "a human being is a social animal"; "mature social behavior"
2.ethnic - not acknowledging the God of Christianity and Judaism and Islam
irreligious - hostile or indifferent to religion

ethnic

ethnical
adjective cultural, national, traditional, native, folk, racial, genetic, indigenous The country's population of over 40 million people is made up of many ethnic groups.
Translations
عِرْقي، خاص بالأعْراقعِرْقِيّ
etnický
etnisk
etninen
etnički
etnikainemzetiséginemzetiségű
òjóîlegur, òjóîernislegur
民族の
인종의
etninisetnologasetnologijaetnologinistautinis
etniskstautas-
etnickýfolklórny
etničen
etnisk
เกี่ยวกับเชื้อชาติ
etnikırksal
thuộc sắc tộc

ethnic

[ˈeθnɪk]
A. ADJ
1. (= racial) [origin, community] → étnico; [conflict, tension] → racial
2. (= non-Western) [music] → étnico; [food, jewellery] → exótico
B. N (esp US) (= person) miembro de una minoría étnica
white ethnic miembro de una minoría étnica de raza blanca
C. CPD ethnic cleansing Nlimpieza f étnica
ethnic group Netnia f, grupo m étnico
ethnic minority Nminoría f étnica

ethnic

[ˈɛθnɪk] adj
(= minority) [group] → ethnique
the ethnic community → les minorités mpl
[tension] → ethnique
[clothes, food] → exotique

ethnic

adj
(= racial)ethnisch; ethnic clashesethnische Konflikte pl; ethnic violenceRassenkrawalle pl; ethnic GermansVolksdeutsche pl
(= traditional) atmosphereurtümlich; fabric, clothesfolkloristisch; ethnic musicFolklore f; in Zambia she bought several pairs of ethnic earringsin Sambia kaufte sie mehrere Paare der dort typischen Ohrringe; books on ethnic foodBücher über das Essen in verschiedenen Kulturen
n ethnics
plMitglieder pleiner ethnischen Gruppe

ethnic

[ˈɛθnɪk] adjetnico/a

ethnic

(ˈeθnik) adjective
of nations or races of mankind or their customs, dress, food etc. ethnic groups/dances.
ethnology (eθˈnolədʒi) noun
the study of the different races of mankind.
ˌethnoˈlogical (-ˈlo-) adjective
ethˈnologist noun

ethnic

عِرْقِيّ etnický etnisk ethnisch εθνικός étnico etninen ethnique etnički etnico 民族の 인종의 etnisch etnisk etyczny étnico этнический etnisk เกี่ยวกับเชื้อชาติ etnik thuộc sắc tộc 种族的

ethnic

a. étnico, rel. a la raza

ethnic

adj étnico
References in periodicals archive ?
The ethnics must keep their arms and ready to struggle again as we have done for the last 67 years or so.
Starting in the interwar years and accelerating in post World War Two period, Germans took up an identity as "white ethnics." This expressed their solidarity with fellow Italians, Irish and others and to state their opposition to the growing presence of Blacks in their neighborhoods.
But the fading novelty factor, plus a national economy pinched by high oil prices, natural disasters, and the protracted conflict in Iraq--not to mention product performance and ethnics' special grooming needs, have caused the ethnic sector, again like the mainstream, to settle into a more reasonable pattern of interspersing use of traditional ethnic-specific products with non-ethnic-specific splurge items.
Some of the history textbooks Malkin indignantly quotes probably do err on the side of dismissing all World War II-era concerns about subversive activities by Japanese ethnics as unfounded paranoia.
From Paesani to White Ethnics: The Italian Experience in Philadelphia.
Although "Americanization" was clearly a force among second-generation ethnics, and class "status" in the American context meant a strict gender definition of "appropriate" women's work, this does not mean that all farm women, even those of English background, shared this vision of womanhood.
ADVANCEMENT IN THEORIZATION OF ETHNIC ECONOMY AND THE NEED FOR A NEW APPROACH TO DEFINING CONTEMPORARY ETHNIC RETAILING
This article explores the underlying processes that influence the ways in which mainstream and ethnic media shape ethnic minority audiences' self-concepts.
The main focus of this paper is the study of socio-structural explanations of racial and ethnic conflict, the establishment of ethnicowned and -operated businesses, the political behavior of immigrant-origin ethnic minorities, the theories of ethnic enclaves and immigrant transnationalism, the complexity of contemporary urban ethnic and immigrant communities, and processes mediating ethnic representations.
Choosing ethnic identity explores the ways in which people are able to choose their ethnic identities in contemporary multiethnic societies such as the USA and Britain.
Students of color demanded better access to higher education, changes in the curriculum, the recruitment of more professors of color, and the creation of ethnic studies programs.
This is the third edition of this classic text and perhaps nothing points to the rapidity with which America's racial and ethnic landscape has metamorphasized during the first half of the 1990s than the fact that the authors felt it necessary to revise their text once again only six years after their last edition.