ethnologist


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eth·nol·o·gy

 (ĕth-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The branch of anthropology that analyzes and compares human cultures, as in social structure, language, religion, and technology; cultural anthropology.

eth′no·log′ic (ĕth′nə-lŏj′ĭk), eth′no·log′i·cal adj.
eth′no·log′i·cal·ly adv.
eth·nol′o·gist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ethnologist - an anthropologist who studies ethnology
anthropologist - a social scientist who specializes in anthropology
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
إخْتِصاصي بِعِلْم الأعْراق البَشَرِيَّه
etnolog
etnológus
òjóîfræîingur, òjóîháttafræîingur
etnológ
budun bilim uzmanı

ethnologist

[eθˈnɒlədʒɪst] Netnólogo/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

ethnologist

nEthnologe m, → Ethnologin f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

ethnologist

[ɛθˈnɒlədʒɪst] netnologo/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

ethnic

(ˈeθnik) adjective
of nations or races of mankind or their customs, dress, food etc. ethnic groups/dances.
ethnology (eθˈnolədʒi) noun
the study of the different races of mankind.
ˌethnoˈlogical (-ˈlo-) adjective
ethˈnologist noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
You see, as an ethnologist, the thing's very interesting to me.
"My brother is a great ethnologist," said Valentin.
The science that treats of the various tribes of Man, as robbers, thieves, swindlers, dunces, lunatics, idiots and ethnologists.
Edward Sheriff Curtis (February 16, 1868--October 19, 1952) was an American ethnologist and photographer of the American West and of Native American peoples.
Nevertheless, these works of anonymous weavers of the Caucasus, the Zagros Mountains or the Steppes of Central Asia have remained part of the decorative arts and crafts, drawing the attention of anthropologists, ethnologist and textile dealers.
Wearing partially the "masque of decadence" of the '40s-'50s, strongly torn between extreme ideologies, the ethnologist proves to have a destiny "market by political prejudice", due to options which oscillated from fascism to communism.
But this is very rarely possible and thus a source of frustration for stroke patients," ethnologist Michael Andersen from University of Copenhagen, said.
"In his book, 'Magnificent Molas: The Art of the Kuna Indians,' French ethnologist Michel Perrin said Scottish surgeon Lionel Wafer met the people of the San Blas Archipelago as early as 1681 and noted the women's 'passion for graphic arts.'
of British Columbia) and Jillian, an ethnologist who has worked with the Dane-zaa First Nations since 1978, present a history of the people who were known as the Fort St.
In the words of ethnologist Ilija Suvariev, the Carnival of Strumica is the oldest and the most authentic event of this kind in Macedonia and beyond.
Bourdieu compared his approach to that of 'bureaucratic sociology' that 'only has access to its interviewees through intermediary interviewers and that, unlike even the most cautious ethnologist, has no opportunity to see the interviewees or their immediate environment' (pp.
We do have a couple of obituaries, but it is also appropriate to acknowledge the passing of two distinguished scholarly figures: Alexander 'Sandy' Fenton (1929-2012), ethnologist and champion of vernacular culture, founder of the European Ethnological Research Centre and the Review of Scottish Culture, and director of the National Museum of Antiquities of Scotland; and John Miles Foley (1947-2012), scholar of comparative literature and founder of the journal Oral Tradition, whose work with ancient Greek, Old English, and South Slavic literatures has done much to advance the Parry--Lord theory of oral literature.