ethnomethodology


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eth·no·meth·od·ol·o·gy

 (ĕth′nō-mĕth′ə-dŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The branch of sociology that deals with the codes and conventions of everyday social interactions and activities.

eth′no·meth′od·ol′o·gist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ethnomethodology

(ˌɛθnəʊmɛθəˈdɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Linguistics) a method of studying linguistic communication that emphasizes common-sense views of conversation and the world. Compare phenomenology
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ethnomethodology

Associated with the sociologist Harold Garfinkel, ethnomethodology studies the ways in which people use everyday knowledge to interpret and understand the world and communicate with other people.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in periodicals archive ?
The study is informed by ethnomethodology (EM) and conversation analysis (CA), related sociological approaches.
Their topics include methods and ethics of data collection, the art of transcription: systems and methodological issues, research methodology in classical and neo-Gricean pragmatics, cognitive pragmatics: relevance-theoretic methodology, assessing the comprehension of pragmatic language: sentence judgement tasks, ethnographic methods in pragmatics, ethnomethodology and conversation analysis, critical discourse analysis, corpus pragmatics: from form to function, and corpus-based metapragmatics.
Turner practiced ethnomethodology and conversation analysis before being influenced by the works of A.
Garfinkel, autor do livro Studies in Ethnomethodology (1967), se opoe as nocoes explicativas, concentrando-se nas experiencias, nos "metodos pessoais", na vivencia do individuo, em sua vida cotidiana, em que a realidade e construida socialmente por meio das acoes dos agentes sociais, os quais sao vistos como reflexos das estruturas sociais.
Taking ethnomethodology as an example, George Psathas (1980) explains that it is about understanding processes rather than identifying facts to reveal changing social creations.
For us, ANT was simply another way of being faithful to the insights of ethnomethodology: actors know what they do and we have to learn from them not only what they do, but how and why they do it....
Psathas (eds.) Everyday Language: Studies in Ethnomethodology, New York: Irvington Press, 15-21.
However, its expression in the practice of empirical research stemmed from the so-called Chicago School, where important names like William Thomas and Florian Znaniecki (14), Harold Garfinkel (15) George Hebert Mead (16) and Robert Park (17) and other inaugurated sociologically important approaches, such as symbolic interactionism, ethnography, ethnomethodology and other.
Where there is complete subjectivity, this tends to be associated with methodological approaches such as grounded theory, ethnomethodology, symbolic interactionism (Blumer/Kuhn) and pragmatism.