ethology

(redirected from ethologically)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

e·thol·o·gy

 (ĭ-thŏl′ə-jē, ē-thŏl′-)
n.
1. The scientific study of animal behavior, especially as it occurs in a natural environment.
2. The study of human ethos and its formation.

[French éthologie, from Latin ēthologia, art of depicting character, from Greek ēthologiā : ēthos, character; see ethos + logos, speech, expression; see -logy.]

eth′o·log′i·cal (ĕth′ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
e·thol′o·gist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ethology

(ɪˈθɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Zoology) the study of the behaviour of animals in their normal environment
[C17 (in the obsolete sense: mimicry): via Latin from Greek ēthologia, from ēthos character; current sense, C19]
ethological, ˌethoˈlogic adj
ˌethoˈlogically adv
eˈthologist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

e•thol•o•gy

(iˈθɒl ə dʒi, ɪˈθɒl-)

n.
the study of animal behavior with emphasis on the patterns that occur in natural environments.
[1895–1900; earlier, as the study of relations between an organism and its environment < French éthologie,; see ethos]
e•tho•log•i•cal (ˌi θəˈlɒdʒ ɪ kəl, ˌɛθ ə-) adj.
e`tho•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
e•thol′o•gist, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ethology

the science proposed by John Stuart MUI for the study of the character formation in humans. — ethologic, ethological, adj.
See also: Mankind
the study of animal behavior in relation to habitat. — ethologist, n. — ethological, adj.
See also: Animals
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ethology

1. The branch of zoology that deals with animals in their normal environment.
2. Study of animal behavior.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ethology - the branch of zoology that studies the behavior of animals in their natural habitats
zoological science, zoology - the branch of biology that studies animals
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

ethology

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, while visual memory is diminished in human mothers, recognition memory is unaffected [184, 185], indicating that the latter might be ethologically more important and therefore be maintained.
For his part, Sidman argues that the stimuli and functions examined have not been ethologically relevant and that to map the standard features of conditional discrimination training onto nonhumans may be problematic.
Ethologically, this manifests in highly developed raiding skills.
Many animal models of anxiety examine the natural behavioral patterns of mice and rats to develop ethologically based behavioral tasks.
Also, unlike in the ethologically studied fixed action patterns, the relationship between environmental input that triggers grammatical output is arbitrary (Palmer).
Accordingly, at the ichnogeneric level, it is best assigned to Palaeophycus, most commonly interpreted ethologically as a dwelling structure (domichnion), produced infaunally, and subsequently passively infilled (Pemberton and Frey 1982; Keighley and Pickerill 1995).
de Lecea, "VTA dopaminergic neurons regulate ethologically relevant sleep-wake behaviors," Nature Neuroscience, vol.
Thus we face the urgent task, mandated by law in many cases, but ethologically mandated in all, to evaluate existing practices.