ethyl carbamate


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ethyl carbamate

n.

ethyl carbamate

n
(Elements & Compounds) a colourless odourless crystalline ester that is used in the manufacture of pesticides, fungicides, and pharmaceuticals. Formula: CO(NH2)OC2H5. Also called: urethane
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Ethyl carbamate has been shown to cause cancer when injected into animals and is considered to be probably carcinogenic in man.
As semicarbazide (4) was obtained from ethyl carbamate (3e), the 1H NMR spectrum (300 MHz, CDCl3) of this semicarbazide indicated the disappearance of the signals due to the ethyl group of the starting material and appearance of a two protons singlet at d = 5.
Ethyl carbamate is naturally produced by fermentation, but it is a mild carcinogenic compound.
It presents summaries, critical reviews, and evaluations of evidence on the carcinogenicity of alcohol and ethyl carbamate, drawing on published epidemiological studies, cancer bioassays in experimental animals, mechanistic data, and meta-analyses commissioned by IARC, plus data from government agency reports and doctoral theses.
Despite concerns about potential harms from the chemical composition of unrecorded alcohol, there are surprisingly few data on the problem in the European Region (5, 7) Pilot studies with limited numbers of samples conducted in Lithuania, Hungary and Poland (4, 6, 8) pointed to several possible problems especially relating to a higher alcoholic strength of unrecorded alcohol as well as ethyl carbamate contamination in home produced fruit spirits.
Over the past 15 years I have employed cutting-edge technologies to improve wine yeasts that will prevent the formation of allergens and ethyl carbamate (EC), a carcinogen found in wines.
Beer, beef and mushrooms contain carcinogens such as hydrazine, furocoumarin and ethyl carbamate.
THE EUROPEAN Food Safety Agency (EFSA) is to investigate human health risks caused by the contaminant ethyl carbamate in all alcoholic drinks, focusing particularly on its presence in stone fruit brandies.
Well-known brand names of 10-year-old malt whisky contain higher concentrations of a dangerous chemical called ethyl carbamate that experts have branded a "potential carcinogen".
Research commissioned by the Government's Food Standards Agency shows famous 10-year-old whiskies contain more ethyl carbamate than younger brands.
The issues of urea and ethyl carbamate have been hovering over the wine industry like a little cloud for several years now.
Elsewhere, EFSA is to investigate human health risks caused by the contaminant ethyl carbamate in all alcoholic drinks, focusing particularly on its presence in stone fruit brandies.