etiology


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e·ti·ol·o·gy

also ae·ti·ol·o·gy (ē′tē-ŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. e·ti·ol·o·gies also ae·ti·ol·o·gies
1.
a. The study of causes or origins.
b. The branch of medicine that deals with the causes or origins of disease.
2.
a. Assignment of a cause, an origin, or a reason for something.
b. The cause or origin of a disease or disorder as determined by medical diagnosis.

[Late Latin aetiologia, from Greek aitiologiā : aitiā, cause + -logiā, -logy.]

e′ti·o·log′ic (-ə-lŏj′ĭk), e′ti·o·log′i·cal adj.
e′ti·o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
e′ti·ol′o·gist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

etiology

(ˌiːtɪˈɒlədʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
a variant spelling of aetiology
etiological, etiologic adj
ˌetioˈlogically adv
ˌetiˈologist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

e•ti•ol•o•gy

(ˌi tiˈɒl ə dʒi)

n., pl. -gies.
1.
a. the study of the causes of diseases.
b. the cause or origin of a disease.
2.
a. any study of causes, causation, or causality.
b. the cause postulated for something.
[1545–55; < Latin aetiologia < Greek aitiología determining the cause of something]
e`ti•o•log′ic (-əˈlɒdʒ ɪk) e`ti•o•log′i•cal, adj.
e`ti•ol′o•gist, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

e·ti·ol·o·gy

(ē′tē-ŏl′ə-jē)
The cause or origin of a disease.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

etiology, aetiology

1. the branch of medical science that studies the causes of diseases and the factors underlying their spread.
2. the accumulated knowledge of disease causes. — etiologist, n. — etiologic, etiological, adj.
See also: Disease and Illness
the science of causation. — etiologic, aetiologic, etiological, aetiological, adj.
See also: Philosophy
the science of the causes of natural phenomena. — etiologic, aetiologic, etiological, aetiological, adj.
See also: Nature
the study of the causes for and origin of any phenomena. Also spelled aetiology.etiological, adj.
See also: Origins
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

etiology

A branch of medicine that deals with the causes of diseases.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.etiology - the cause of a diseaseetiology - the cause of a disease    
cause - events that provide the generative force that is the origin of something; "they are trying to determine the cause of the crash"
2.etiology - the philosophical study of causation
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

etiology

[ˌiːtɪˈɒlədʒɪ] Netiología f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

etiology

aetiology [ˌiːtiˈɒlədʒi] n [disease] → étiologie f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

e·ti·ol·o·gy

n. etiología, rama de la medicina que estudia la causa de las enfermedades.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
KEYWORDS: Etiology, Outcomes, Status Epilepticus, Children.
Among the 95 outbreaks with a confirmed infectious etiology, enteric pathogens caused 80 (84%); 21 (22%) were caused by norovirus, 19 (20%) by Escherichia coli, 14 (15%) by Shigella, and 12 (13%) by Cryptosporidium.
MONDAY, June 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For an unselected memory clinic cohort, amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) results are associated with changes in etiology, diagnostic confidence, and patient treatment, according to a study published online June 11 in JAMA Neurology.
NEW YORK -- Explosive outbursts or tantrums accompany nearly every psychiatric illness that affects children, but the specific features may help identify an etiology, according to Gabrielle A.
Etiology of disease, clinical presentation and management outcome were observed.
Despite both common and uncommon known etiologies in stroke patients, the etiology remained undetectable after comprehensive evaluations in some stroke patients (UE stroke).
Objective: The purpose of this retrospective study was to clarify the relationship of shunt infection to childhood hydrocephalus etiology.
Ischemic stroke is divided into five groups: large artery atherosclerosis (LAA), small vessel disease (SVD), cardio embolic disease (CE), other determined etiology, and undetermined etiology.
The most common type of biopsy proven cutaneous vasculitis was cutaneous leukocytoclastic angiitis followed by vasculitis associated with probable etiology.
It may involve otherwise healthy and relatively younger individuals; its etiology may vary with age, geographical location, food habits, and other associated factors.
While the physiological interaction between the kidney and the vascular system has been well established, the etiology of ESRD among HD patients has been poorly investigated in the context of arterial stiffness and CV risk.
Causes of hip microinstability include underlying bony or soft tissue abnormalities and iatrogenic injuries of the hip capsule; however, many patients lack a clear underlying etiology. Treatment usually begins with an extensive course of non-operative management with an emphasis on activity modification and physical therapy.