etymologically


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et·y·mo·log·i·cal

 (ĕt′ə-mə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) also et·y·mo·log·ic (-lŏj′ĭk)
adj.
Of or relating to etymology or based on the principles of etymology.

et′y·mo·log′i·cal·ly adv.
Translations

etymologically

[ˌetɪməˈlɒdʒɪkəlɪ] ADVetimológicamente

etymologically

[ˌɛtɪməˈlɒdʒɪklɪ] advetimologicamente
References in classic literature ?
Etymologically, the word means unbeliever, and its present
It's an example of what's called "word aversion," which is described as "a feeling of intense, irrational distaste for the sound or sight of a particular word or phrase, not because its use is regarded as etymologically or logically or grammatically wrong, nor because it's felt to be over-used or redundant or trendy or non-standard, but simply because the word itself somehow feels unpleasant or even disgusting.
Etymologically this comes from the Greek word 'psyche,' which means 'mind' or 'soul.
A Sanskrit English Dictionary Etymologically and Philologically Arranged with Special Reference to Cognate Indo-European Languages.
better timer=nni) is etymologically derived from the Indo-Aryan
clip nip / clod sod / get net / knuckle buckle / mug jug / swell well (synonyms twice, with two different meanings of both, some not even etymologically related; detailed in Nov.
The difference between the Italian forms and the Latin forms is that the Latin -i may be extended to words where it did not belong etymologically, indicating a certain degree of productivity for that suffix.
Etymologically "neutropposition" means "neutrosophic opposition".
This is aptly done by author and statistician, Nate Silver, in his book "The Signal and the Noise: Why So Many Predictions Fail-but Some Don't", where he etymologically described prediction as "associating it with fatalism, fortune-telling, and superstition.
Those who see ousia, and its Doric equivalent osi a as etymologically related are committed to incessant flux; for Horky that includes Epicharmus and Empedocles.
It is significant that, etymologically, our companions are those with whom we share bread.
Sufi practice has often been depicted as a purification process, and Sufi scholars have noted that it's no coincidence that, etymologically speaking "Sufi" is connected to the word "safi" (pure).