etymologically


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et·y·mo·log·i·cal

 (ĕt′ə-mə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) also et·y·mo·log·ic (-lŏj′ĭk)
adj.
Of or relating to etymology or based on the principles of etymology.

et′y·mo·log′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

etymologically

[ˌetɪməˈlɒdʒɪkəlɪ] ADVetimológicamente
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

etymologically

[ˌɛtɪməˈlɒdʒɪklɪ] advetimologicamente
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Etymologically, the word means unbeliever, and its present signification may be regarded as theology's noblest contribution to the development of our language.
Etymologically, one would be justified if one thought that populism was about unity.
In Dholuo, then, ich is etymologically related to iye, which translates as "inside" or "within".But in writing, the Luo word ich might strike a German simply as "I" whenever the German is visiting Nyanza, the land of Kenya's Dholuo speakers.
These three homophones have three different meanings yet all are related etymologically. Unique?
(2.) Here names are included that are only etymologically classifiable as such: Daryaw, Zardrust, etc.
In this moment in time, we should just realize that the study of psychology, etymologically speaking, is exactly the same as the study of the spirit, of that "fluctuating" which is the foundation of everything that exists and of which, according to science, we are aware for only about 4%.
Etymologically, integrity, a Latin adjective called integer, means whole or complete.
We of the Spear-Danes in days-of-yore" - but, as McWhorter points out, "What", although it is cognate with (etymologically linked to) Hwaet, makes no sense to modern English ears, and is therefore a poor translation.
"Etymologically, the pronunciation of 'quinoa' is really interesting.
Perhaps, but if there is something conservative about Brassai's gesture, his translation also makes perfect sense: Texture and textile, after all, are etymologically bound together, and these works take great pleasure in sussing out the connection.