etymologicum

etymologicum

(ˌɛtɪməˈlɒdʒɪkəm) or

etymologicon

n
(Journalism & Publishing) an etymological dictionary
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
`guide' in virtues and technical arts), and to refer to the pitiful attempts in the "Etymologicum Magnum" (s.v.
e) Etymologicum (o "Las Etimologias" de San Isidoro de Sevilla, +636), obra enciclopedica basada en el codigo Teodosiano y en la obra de Justiniano.
(2) They are: MSS Junius 4 and 5, Junius's etymological dictionary of English, published posthumously in 1743 by the antiquarian Edward Lye under the title Etymologicum Anglicanunr, MS Junius 6, his glossary of Chaucer's works; MS Junius 9, his annotated edition of The Workes of Our Antient and Learned English Poet, Geffrey Chaucer, Newly Printed, ed.
(65) This word was also included in the Etymologicum Magnum, edited by Musurus in 1499.
Hasdeu: Etymologicum Magnum Romaniae, Iorgu Iordan, Dictionary of Romanian Family Names, 1983, etc.
Etymologicum Teutonicae linguae sive dictionarium Teutonico-Latinum.
A very interesting set of Greek prose fragments has recently been collected from the Etymologicum Genuinum through careful philological and lexical research: their discoverer, Alpers (1996), has edited and discussed the fragments, and shown that they belong together as fragments from a lost longer fictional prose text which should be dated not later than the beginning or middle of the 2nd century A.D.
Holyoke (ed.), A Large Dictionary In Three Parts (London, 1677), part 11 'Lexicon philologicum et dictionarium etymologicum', s.v.
Etymologicum Anglicanum, where the poem is often used for citations, for example, s.vv.