etymology

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et·y·mol·o·gy

 (ĕt′ə-mŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. et·y·mol·o·gies
1. The origin and historical development of a linguistic form as shown by determining its basic elements, earliest known use, and changes in form and meaning, tracing its transmission from one language to another, identifying its cognates in other languages, and reconstructing its ancestral form where possible.
2. The branch of linguistics that deals with etymologies.

[Middle English etimologie, from Old French ethimologie, from Medieval Latin ethimologia, from Latin etymologia, from Greek etumologiā : etumon, true sense of a word; see etymon + -logiā, -logy.]

etymology

(ˌɛtɪˈmɒlədʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
1. (Linguistics) the study of the sources and development of words and morphemes
2. (Linguistics) an account of the source and development of a word or morpheme
[C14: via Latin from Greek etumologia; see etymon, -logy]
etymological adj
ˌetymoˈlogically adv
ˌetyˈmologist n

et•y•mol•o•gy

(ˌɛt əˈmɒl ə dʒi)

n., pl. -gies.
1. the history of a particular word or element of a word.
2. an account of the origin and development of a word or word element.
3. the study of historical linguistic change, esp. as manifested in individual words.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin etymologia < Greek etymología; see etymon, -logy]
et`y•mo•log′i•cal (-məˈlɒdʒ ɪ kəl) adj.
et`y•mo•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
et`y•mol′o•gist, n.

etymology

the branch of linguistics that studies the origin and history of words. — etymologist, n. — etymologie, etymological, adj.
See also: Language
the study of the origin and history of individual words. — etymologist, n. — etymological, adj.
See also: Linguistics

etymology

1. The study of the origins and development of words.
2. The study of the history of words, tracing them back to their earliest recorded forms.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.etymology - a history of a word
account, chronicle, history, story - a record or narrative description of past events; "a history of France"; "he gave an inaccurate account of the plot to kill the president"; "the story of exposure to lead"
folk etymology - a popular but erroneous etymology
2.etymology - the study of the sources and development of words
linguistics - the scientific study of language
lexicostatistics - a statistical technique used in glottochronology; used to estimate how long ago different languages evolved from a common source language

etymology

noun derivation, word history, development of words, history of words, origin of words The etymology of the word 'neon' is the Greek for 'new'.
Translations
etimologia
etymologie
etymologi
etümoloogia
etymologia
etimologija
etimológiaszófejtés
orðsifjafræðiorðsifjar
語源語源学
etymologi
etymologiaźródłosłów
etimologie
etimologija
etymologi

etymology

[ˌetɪˈmɒlədʒɪ] Netimología f

etymology

[ˌɛtɪˈmɒlədʒi] n [word] → étymologie f

etymology

nEtymologie f

etymology

[ˌɛtɪˈmɒlədʒɪ] netimologia
References in periodicals archive ?
Before looking at the various etymologies of [square root of (term)]prns previously proposed in the scholarly literature, it is necessary to outline the distribution of this root in Aramaic and Hebrew.
Of the 150 sets of terms 106sets present etymology in Arabic language 37 sets present etymology in Persian language 3 sets present etymology in Turkish language and 1 set presents etymology in Arabic language and arrived in Turkish and Urdu through Persian language (as discussed earliar Persian language itself had received numerous loanwords from Arabic language) 4 sets present differing etymologies.
Also new examples of this development seem to be found; see etymologies 6 and 10 below.
According to biographer Humphrey Carpenter, in his first weeks Tolkien was assigned etymologies of warm, wasp, water, wick, and winter, among others (qtd.
They are creative etymologies that focus on words that mean different, sometimes opposing things today than they may have when they were first coined.
Young Shetlanders could benefit from a new dictionary giving sound etymologies of the rich dialect words used by their grandparents' generation, and in many instances by their parents' generation as well.
However, since the following depends so much on the acceptance of etymologies as a source of important information, I consider it my duty to acknowledge the controversial aspects of this issue.
Isidore of Seville, The Etymologies of Isidore of Seville, trans.
There were free dictionaries with definitions, some lists of slang words and their sources, and some sites that listed a few dozen of the strangest etymologies of English words.
To be sure, the astonishing aspect of this work is that "[u]nlike [a] 1904 encyclopedia, Isidore's Etymologies was consulted a century after its composition, and two centuries later, and eight more centuries later still" (19).
Each entry is identified by part of speech, inflections, order of senses, examples of usage and etymologies.