etymologist


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et·y·mol·o·gist

 (ĕt′ə-mŏl′ə-jĭst)
n.
A specialist in etymology.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

etymologist

A person who studies the origins of words.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.etymologist - a lexicographer who specializes in etymology
lexicographer, lexicologist - a compiler or writer of a dictionary; a student of the lexical component of language
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
etimolog

etymologist

[ˌetɪˈmɒlədʒɪst] Netimólogo/a m/f, etimologista mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
The etymologist finds the deadest word to have been once a brilliant picture.
This word "arthurization" has long puzzled the etymologists, but its derivation, I hope, is now made clear.
IMAKE no excuses for liking words, which is probably why, if I had one, my pin-up would be Susie Dent from Countdown, who is described as a lexicographer, etymologist and author, and how sexy does that sound?
My Dad was an etymologist. So lettering and text has always been a way I like to think about the world, it feels very much part of me.
"Nobody likes to get bitten by ants or wasps or anything like that and mosquitoes are potentially transmitting diseases," says Chelle Hartzer, an etymologist with Orkin in Atlanta.
In the opening chapter, Parsons lays the groundwork for his argument by mining the letters of the orthographer and etymologist John O'Donovan, one of the key contributors to the survey, to illustrate "the paradox that is at the center of the survey's work" (68), namely that even as it enacts imperial and epistemic control, so too does it exemplify the slippage of such controls under the divergent possibilities of local, oral, and folkloric histories.
Suhail Bukhari, the famed Urdu etymologist, used to tell us that as compared to other Indian languages, Punjabi is among the most expressive, spontaneous and adept at describing a situation.
Some lexicographers may disagree with him, but Salah Stetie is perfectly fluent in both languages and is speaking as a poet, rather than as an etymologist.
This illustrated talk by biographer Frank Grant will shed new light on W P Haskett Smith, 'the father of rock climbing', who was also a barrister, genealogist, philologist, etymologist, antiquarian and prolific writer.
Here, then, is the most immediate function of selecting such a number: Whitman, the lifelong etymologist and word lover, deliberately chooses the freshest word, direct, unusual, poetically unassociated, free of threadbareness.
At Institute seminars, Ray Bontrager becomes the chief lecturer on theory, Harry Holtzman lectures on art (or "nonverbal abstracting," as he calls it), neurosurgeon Russell Meyers gives talks relating the functioning of the nervous system to general semantics, and Charlotte Selver supplies "sensory awareness" workshops--Charlotte Schuchardt Read, the wife of the famed etymologist and lexicographer Allen Walker Read, will later deliver these workshops.