etymologist


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Related to etymologist: etymologically

et·y·mol·o·gist

 (ĕt′ə-mŏl′ə-jĭst)
n.
A specialist in etymology.

etymologist

A person who studies the origins of words.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.etymologist - a lexicographer who specializes in etymology
lexicographer, lexicologist - a compiler or writer of a dictionary; a student of the lexical component of language
Translations
etimolog

etymologist

[ˌetɪˈmɒlədʒɪst] Netimólogo/a m/f, etimologista mf
References in classic literature ?
The etymologist finds the deadest word to have been once a brilliant picture.
This word "arthurization" has long puzzled the etymologists, but its derivation, I hope, is now made clear.
Suhail Bukhari, the famed Urdu etymologist, used to tell us that as compared to other Indian languages, Punjabi is among the most expressive, spontaneous and adept at describing a situation.
Some lexicographers may disagree with him, but Salah Stetie is perfectly fluent in both languages and is speaking as a poet, rather than as an etymologist.
This illustrated talk by biographer Frank Grant will shed new light on W P Haskett Smith, 'the father of rock climbing', who was also a barrister, genealogist, philologist, etymologist, antiquarian and prolific writer.
Here, then, is the most immediate function of selecting such a number: Whitman, the lifelong etymologist and word lover, deliberately chooses the freshest word, direct, unusual, poetically unassociated, free of threadbareness.
Among the collection of books and manuscripts left to the Bodleian Library by the seventeenth-century Dutch philologist, art historian, etymologist and lexicographer, Francis Junius (1591-1677), there are six items which provide evidence of Junius's interest in Scots.
Philip Durkin, the principal etymologist of The Oxford English Dictionary, argues that attempting to pinpoint the exact parentage of any specific vernacular offshoot of mysterium as opposed to ministerium 'may prove impossible'.
A true etymologist might see this as so much old news, but Stevens puts Sanskrit, Latin and Greek to good use as bridges to modernity.
2) As an etymologist, Tolkien would have been, and probably was, aware of the fact that 'catholic' is simply Greek for 'universal'--that is, his Catholic mythology was aimed to address the common condition humaine.
Some people criticised it, including Thomas Babington Macaulay, who described Johnson as "a wretched etymologist.
From a site called World Wide Words--Investigating the English Language Across the Globe--which is devoted to linguistics and run by a British etymologist, I found the following history of the term "headshrinker":