etymologist


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et·y·mol·o·gist

 (ĕt′ə-mŏl′ə-jĭst)
n.
A specialist in etymology.

etymologist

A person who studies the origins of words.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.etymologist - a lexicographer who specializes in etymology
lexicographer, lexicologist - a compiler or writer of a dictionary; a student of the lexical component of language
Translations
etimolog

etymologist

[ˌetɪˈmɒlədʒɪst] Netimólogo/a m/f, etimologista mf
References in classic literature ?
The etymologist finds the deadest word to have been once a brilliant picture.
This word "arthurization" has long puzzled the etymologists, but its derivation, I hope, is now made clear.
A true etymologist might see this as so much old news, but Stevens puts Sanskrit, Latin and Greek to good use as bridges to modernity.
2) As an etymologist, Tolkien would have been, and probably was, aware of the fact that 'catholic' is simply Greek for 'universal'--that is, his Catholic mythology was aimed to address the common condition humaine.
Some people criticised it, including Thomas Babington Macaulay, who described Johnson as "a wretched etymologist.
From a site called World Wide Words--Investigating the English Language Across the Globe--which is devoted to linguistics and run by a British etymologist, I found the following history of the term "headshrinker":
BEING such a lover of words, I'm generally etymologically curious, and you'll be unsurprised to note that one of my favourite 'clever clever' jokes is 'what's the difference between an etymologist and an endomologist?
In a 2009 column for The Oxford Etymologist entitled "Why Don't We Know the Origin of the Word Ghetto?
THIS HANDSOME BOOK had its genesis in a conference held at Cambridge in 2009 to commemorate the hundredth anniversary of the death of Whitley Stokes, philologist, etymologist, codifier of Anglo-Indian law, scholar and editor.
The etymologist finds the deadest word to have been once a brilliant picture.
Charlotte Schuchardt Read, who acquired that last name when she married famed etymologist and lexicographer Allen Walker Read in 1953, later delivered such workshops.
The research has been conducted by Peter Doyle, a military historian, and Julian Walker, an etymologist, who have analysed thousands of documents from the period - including letters from the front, trench newspapers, diaries, books and official military records - to trace how language changed during the four years of the war.