etymology

(redirected from etymologists)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to etymologists: etymologically

etymology

study of the history of words
Not to be confused with:
entomology – scientific study of insects

et·y·mol·o·gy

 (ĕt′ə-mŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. et·y·mol·o·gies
1. The origin and historical development of a linguistic form as shown by determining its basic elements, earliest known use, and changes in form and meaning, tracing its transmission from one language to another, identifying its cognates in other languages, and reconstructing its ancestral form where possible.
2. The branch of linguistics that deals with etymologies.

[Middle English etimologie, from Old French ethimologie, from Medieval Latin ethimologia, from Latin etymologia, from Greek etumologiā : etumon, true sense of a word; see etymon + -logiā, -logy.]

etymology

(ˌɛtɪˈmɒlədʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
1. (Linguistics) the study of the sources and development of words and morphemes
2. (Linguistics) an account of the source and development of a word or morpheme
[C14: via Latin from Greek etumologia; see etymon, -logy]
etymological adj
ˌetymoˈlogically adv
ˌetyˈmologist n

et•y•mol•o•gy

(ˌɛt əˈmɒl ə dʒi)

n., pl. -gies.
1. the history of a particular word or element of a word.
2. an account of the origin and development of a word or word element.
3. the study of historical linguistic change, esp. as manifested in individual words.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin etymologia < Greek etymología; see etymon, -logy]
et`y•mo•log′i•cal (-məˈlɒdʒ ɪ kəl) adj.
et`y•mo•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
et`y•mol′o•gist, n.

etymology

the branch of linguistics that studies the origin and history of words. — etymologist, n. — etymologie, etymological, adj.
See also: Language
the study of the origin and history of individual words. — etymologist, n. — etymological, adj.
See also: Linguistics

etymology

1. The study of the origins and development of words.
2. The study of the history of words, tracing them back to their earliest recorded forms.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.etymology - a history of a word
account, chronicle, history, story - a record or narrative description of past events; "a history of France"; "he gave an inaccurate account of the plot to kill the president"; "the story of exposure to lead"
folk etymology - a popular but erroneous etymology
2.etymology - the study of the sources and development of words
linguistics - the scientific study of language
lexicostatistics - a statistical technique used in glottochronology; used to estimate how long ago different languages evolved from a common source language

etymology

noun derivation, word history, development of words, history of words, origin of words The etymology of the word 'neon' is the Greek for 'new'.
Translations
etimologia
etymologie
etymologi
etümoloogia
etymologia
etimologija
etimológiaszófejtés
orðsifjafræðiorðsifjar
語源語源学
etymologi
etymologiaźródłosłów
etimologie
etimologija
etymologi

etymology

[ˌetɪˈmɒlədʒɪ] Netimología f

etymology

[ˌɛtɪˈmɒlədʒi] n [word] → étymologie f

etymology

nEtymologie f

etymology

[ˌɛtɪˈmɒlədʒɪ] netimologia
References in classic literature ?
This word "arthurization" has long puzzled the etymologists, but its derivation, I hope, is now made clear.
The etymologist finds the deadest word to have been once a brilliant picture.
Even etymologists, though, concede that irony is a tricky blighter, so I normally steer clear.
The term "bur#269iak", according to etymologists, is composed of two stems ndash "bur" and "d#382ak", the one referring to its stormy nature and the other giving thanks for the harvest.Bur#269iak, as a strictly seasonal product lasting for only a few days, used to be consumed only in winegrowing regions before the emergence of fast transport and modern artificial cooling.
And if you say a guy is 86, that means he's fired or all washed up or something like that." As eighty-six grew in popularity (spawning the verb form by the late 1940s), the rest of the soda-counter code faded from memory, and amateur etymologists came up with their own conjectures for where the number came from.
Fuller did a lot of research and talked to etymologists and other mosquito professionals in order to come up with a cutting-edge, environmentally responsible mosquito management treatment for people's yards, as well as businesses, outdoor eating environments, golf courses, campgrounds, hotels and festivals.
Which, for the etymologists among you, is precisely the word, "orient" having its roots in "oriri", which is Latin for rise, and then "orient", also Latin, meaning "rising" or "east".
Maybe medieval French etymologists had a premonition about marriage in the latter part of the millennium and decided it was inappropriate.
Etymologists posit that it was coined as a combination of the word gaze and the Latin ending -ebo that is found in Latin words such as videbo, meaning "I shall see." The word gazebo was originally used for a structure on a house that provided a view, such as a cupola or turret, or to some larger structure designed to command a view.
"According to Chinese etymologists the symbol Ti [for God] was a symbol of the calyx and the heart of a flower, from which the generations of the blossoms, fruit and new plant will develop." Chang, Creativity and Daoism (60) The Daoist plant-model is as deeply rooted in Chinese culture as the animal-model is rooted in the West.
Etymologists traced the origin of approximately six hundred words that were loaned or borrowed into English from Old Norse.