eugenics

(redirected from eugenical)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

eu·gen·ics

 (yo͞o-jĕn′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study or practice of attempting to improve the human gene pool by encouraging the reproduction of people considered to have desirable traits and discouraging or preventing the reproduction of people considered to have undesirable traits.

eu·gen′ic adj.
eu·gen′i·cal·ly adv.

eugenics

(juːˈdʒɛnɪks)
n
(Genetics) (functioning as singular) the study of methods of improving the quality of the human race, esp by selective breeding
[C19: from Greek eugenēs well-born, from eu- + -genēs born; see -gen]
euˈgenic, euˈgenical adj
euˈgenically adv
euˈgenicist, euˈgenecist n
eugenist n, adj

eu•gen•ics

(yuˈdʒɛn ɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
a science concerned with improving a species, esp. the human species, by such means as influencing or encouraging reproduction by persons presumed to have desirable genetic traits.
[1880–85]
eu•gen′i•cist (-ə sɪst) n.

eugenics

the science of improving a breed or species through the careful selection of parents. — eugenicist, n. — eugenic, adj.
See also: Improvement
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eugenics - the study of methods of improving genetic qualities by selective breeding (especially as applied to human mating)
bioscience, life science - any of the branches of natural science dealing with the structure and behavior of living organisms
cacogenics, dysgenics - the study of the operation of factors causing degeneration in the type of offspring produced
Translations

eugenics

[juːˈdʒenɪks] NSINGeugenesia f

eugenics

[juːˈdʒɛnɪks] neugénisme m

eugenics

n singEugenik f

eugenics

[juːˈdʒɛnɪks] nsgeugenica

eu·gen·ics

n. eugenesia, ciencia que estudia el mejoramiento de la especie humana de acuerdo con las leyes biológicas de la herencia.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1922, Laughlin published Eugenical Sterilization in the United States to help states pass constitutional compulsory sterilization laws.
From Victorian times to the early Cold River Institute genealogical studies, all these eugenical movements thought they had a good intention:" If only we had the right kinds of people, we would improve society.
As Attewell acknowledges in her introduction, eugenics was in the cultural mainstream in the early twentieth century, and Donald Childs has shown how influential eugenical thought was on writers like Woolf, Yeats, Shaw, and others.
In 1914, Harry Laughlin published a Model Eugenical Sterilization Law that would authorize sterilization of the "socially inadequate," that is, those supported in institutions or maintained wholly or in part at public expense.
Apparently, however, the apocalpse is brought as a by-product of the eugenical "Project" Crake undertakes on behalf of 'RejoovEnesens' that aims to secretly sterilize entire humanity and replace it with a spliced breed of humanoids designed to be docile, smart and beautiful.
At the same time, Woolf suggests the culture's demise through the very social strategies and sciences--medical, eugenical, and evolutionary--that work to define its place at the top of a great chain of being, itself understood as a geo-political as well as metaphysical hierarchy.
Almira Pryde's "moral serenity" and rabbit-like fecundity conform to the same stereotypes of poor white sexuality that made poor white women suspect guardians of white racial purity and, following passage of Virginia's Eugenical Sterilization Act in 1923, put them at risk of compulsory sterilization for being the "potential parent of socially inadequate offspring" (Wray 92).
These organizations--which functioned as part of a closely-knit network--published racist eugenic newsletters and pseudoscientific journals, such as Eugenical News and Eugenics, and propagandized for the Nazis.
These claims about Beckett suggestively offer a transition into the concluding chapter, which Oser begins by provocatively proposing a modernist defense for its appropriation of eugenical discourse.
Bell, (59) in which the Court upheld the constitutionality of Virginia's Eugenical Sterilization Act authorizing the compulsory sterilization of mentally defective persons for eugenic purposes.
Unfortunately, many of these American eugenicists found their way into positions of power that gave them access to public policy-making, and the wheels of government, which enabled them to influence and affect the establishment of eugenical programs in almost every state in the nation.