eugenics

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Related to eugenist: Margaret Sanger

eu·gen·ics

 (yo͞o-jĕn′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study or practice of attempting to improve the human gene pool by encouraging the reproduction of people considered to have desirable traits and discouraging or preventing the reproduction of people considered to have undesirable traits.

eu·gen′ic adj.
eu·gen′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

eugenics

(juːˈdʒɛnɪks)
n
(Genetics) (functioning as singular) the study of methods of improving the quality of the human race, esp by selective breeding
[C19: from Greek eugenēs well-born, from eu- + -genēs born; see -gen]
euˈgenic, euˈgenical adj
euˈgenically adv
euˈgenicist, euˈgenecist n
eugenist n, adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

eu•gen•ics

(yuˈdʒɛn ɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
a science concerned with improving a species, esp. the human species, by such means as influencing or encouraging reproduction by persons presumed to have desirable genetic traits.
[1880–85]
eu•gen′i•cist (-ə sɪst) n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

eugenics

the science of improving a breed or species through the careful selection of parents. — eugenicist, n. — eugenic, adj.
See also: Improvement
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eugenics - the study of methods of improving genetic qualities by selective breeding (especially as applied to human mating)
bioscience, life science - any of the branches of natural science dealing with the structure and behavior of living organisms
cacogenics, dysgenics - the study of the operation of factors causing degeneration in the type of offspring produced
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

eugenics

[juːˈdʒenɪks] NSINGeugenesia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

eugenics

[juːˈdʒɛnɪks] neugénisme m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

eugenics

n singEugenik f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

eugenics

[juːˈdʒɛnɪks] nsgeugenica
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

eu·gen·ics

n. eugenesia, ciencia que estudia el mejoramiento de la especie humana de acuerdo con las leyes biológicas de la herencia.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(17) The Society based their knowledge of the "social problem group" partially on the work of eugenist E.
For example, a study of 1000 baby books such as this, carefully filled out, will give valuable information in every department of medicine, will guide the teacher, the physical culturist, the eugenist (sic), and the statesman, in their broad efforts to improve the race, as well as the physician in the treatment of the individual case.
While she says that early fashioning of Anglo-Saxonism is the "'ancient' ballad structure" for the "full orchestral and eugenist racist symphonies of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries" (5), in many ways her book instead proposes that the music of modern racism is the basic structure for an earlier system.
In fact, since Rathbone "evidently" felt that "the eugenist is likely to be a hostile critic" (Fisher: 153) 'The Case of the Opposition' in The Disinherited Family, rather than revealing Rathbone's eugenic sympathies, reflected one of her rules for reforming success, "the importance of meeting your opponent's case as it looks to him, not as it looks to you" (Harrison: 122).
Curthoys, A 1988, 'Marion Louisa Piddington (1869-1950), eugenist and sex educator', in G Serle (ed.), Australian dictionary of biography, 11, Melbourne University Press, pp.
When environmental conditions were thought of as the natural result of actions taken by a debased race, poverty became a "biological condition" for which the only rational (my italics) response was, in the words of "the eugenist and imperialist Arnold White," "to let them die out by leaving them alone" (24).
Glanville Williams, a British proponent of eugenic sterilization, noted that the "obvious social importance" of preventing the births of children who are affected by congenital diseases "has naturally given rise to the proposal to use sterilisation of the unfit as a means of racial improvement." (109) To this, he added that "[w]hether or not a genetic decline has set in, the fact remains that the community is burdened with an enormous number of unfit members, and that every humane person must concur with the eugenist in wishing to see an improvement." (110)
This chapter weaves fascinating accounts of public health issues, like vaccinations, drawn from mainstream and nationalist presses to demonstrate why we must regard Playboy as a "eugenist parable" (107) that stimulated anxieties in its audiences because it engaged with nationalist concerns regarding the health and purity of the Irish male body.
The Sydney-based O'Reilly was a brother of the eugenist, feminist and advocate of birth control, Marion Piddington: (60) so a preoccupation with motherhood, the sex question, and the vitality of the race was something of a family tradition, continued by O'Reilly's talented daughter, Eleanor Dark, in her novel Prelude to Christopher (1934).
The use of images such as the doting mother and the toiling youth points toward an anxiety about idle hands and leisure time, the devil's playthings and the eugenist's worst nightmare.
However, in his widely read book, The Criminal, the English Lombrosian and eugenist Havelock Ellis rejected as less than authoritative Lombroso's claim that in the search for criminals one must go "as far back as" various insectivorous plants.