eugenics

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Related to eugenists: Eugenism

eu·gen·ics

 (yo͞o-jĕn′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study or practice of attempting to improve the human gene pool by encouraging the reproduction of people considered to have desirable traits and discouraging or preventing the reproduction of people considered to have undesirable traits.

eu·gen′ic adj.
eu·gen′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

eugenics

(juːˈdʒɛnɪks)
n
(Genetics) (functioning as singular) the study of methods of improving the quality of the human race, esp by selective breeding
[C19: from Greek eugenēs well-born, from eu- + -genēs born; see -gen]
euˈgenic, euˈgenical adj
euˈgenically adv
euˈgenicist, euˈgenecist n
eugenist n, adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

eu•gen•ics

(yuˈdʒɛn ɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
a science concerned with improving a species, esp. the human species, by such means as influencing or encouraging reproduction by persons presumed to have desirable genetic traits.
[1880–85]
eu•gen′i•cist (-ə sɪst) n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

eugenics

the science of improving a breed or species through the careful selection of parents. — eugenicist, n. — eugenic, adj.
See also: Improvement
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eugenics - the study of methods of improving genetic qualities by selective breeding (especially as applied to human mating)
bioscience, life science - any of the branches of natural science dealing with the structure and behavior of living organisms
cacogenics, dysgenics - the study of the operation of factors causing degeneration in the type of offspring produced
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

eugenics

[juːˈdʒenɪks] NSINGeugenesia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

eugenics

[juːˈdʒɛnɪks] neugénisme m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

eugenics

n singEugenik f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

eugenics

[juːˈdʒɛnɪks] nsgeugenica
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

eu·gen·ics

n. eugenesia, ciencia que estudia el mejoramiento de la especie humana de acuerdo con las leyes biológicas de la herencia.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The introduction to a 1910 interview with Galton published in London's Jewish Chronicle states that Galton's work on eugenics is relevant to Jews because, "It may be said that from the days of Moses the Jews have been 'eugenists' [sic]." (38) This sentiment was echoed by other proponents of Jewish racial thought such as the rabbi Max Reichler.
Vasconcelos, along with other Latin American eugenists, endorsed the concept of racial purity, but instead of accepting Eurocentric values "praised racial hybridization as itself a form of eugenization that would help consolidate the nation around the mestizo".
Did the eugenists really need to receive the support of their class enemies as well as their old friends, if they were to succeed in pushing through their programme?
Pope Plus XI strongly condemned forced sterilization in an encyclical in 1930, criticizing eugenists for calling on "the civil authority to arrogate to itself a power over a faculty which it never had and can never legitimately possess," and evangelical firebrand William Jennings Bryan dismissed eugenics in the 1920s as a program for "scientific breeding ...
Here is Richardson's explanation: Embracing the idea of evolution, eugenists argued that through the judicious control of human reproduction, and the numerical increase of the middle class, paradise on earth might be gained, and Britain's supremacy in the world maintained.
Important though this objective was to eugenists, their more immediate goal in advocating and ultimately securing passage of the Act was to address what was perceived to be a serious and growing problem of public order and public health--namely the problem of the feebleminded as a menace to society, as a source of rampant crime and moral delinquency.
and guided by the nation's anthropologists, eugenists [sic] and social philosophers, has been able to construct a comprehensive racial policy of population development and improvement that promises to be epochal in racial history.'" (182)
In the 1890s, buffeted by the relentless pressure of socialism with its assumption about natural rights on the one hand and the increasing influence of eugenists like Karl Pearson and Francis Galton on the other, Huxley, agreeing with neither camp, focuses on evolutionary versus ethical forces (on biology versus morality); or, as Adrian Desmond writes, on "how far moral rights should infringe on a natural `unmitigated selfishness'" (Desmond, 578).
Social reformers, doctors and eugenists documented the harm they believed wage-earning mothers inflicted on babies and children.