euphausiid


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to euphausiid: Chaetognatha

euphausiid

(juːˈfɔːzɪɪd) or

euphausid

n
(Animals) any small pelagic shrimplike crustacean of the order Euphausiacea: an important constituent of krill
[C19: from New Latin Euphausiacea, perhaps from Greek eu- + pha- from phainein to reveal, show + ousia substance, stuff]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
As this species has been observed feeding on prey items such as the euphausiid Nyctiphanes simplex, the copepod Acartia spp., other crustacean's larvae and fish eggs (Ketchum et al., 2013).
The influence of layer depth and sampling time (day/night) on euphausiid abundance was estimated.
Biology of the subtropical sac-spawning euphausiid Nyctiphanes simplex in the northwestern seas of Mexico: interbrood period, gonad development, and lipid content.
Periodic mixing of populations of Thysanoessa species, the euphausiid intermediate host of Alcataenia, occurs along the seas adjacent to the North Pacific and those along the Siberian Arctic.
Distributional patterns of the euphausiid community in Bahia de La Paz, B.C.S., Mexico.
Their analysis also showed an overlap in space and time between Pacific hake and euphausiid distributions around La Perouse Bank, and they concluded that in warmer years Pacific hake deplete local euphausiid prey resources more quickly and move northward earlier than in cooler years, thus increasing predation pressure upon Pacific herring, Clupea harengus pallasi, stocks.
Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba, is the largest and often the most abundant of five shrimp-shaped euphausiid species that inhabit Southern Ocean waters.
In the submarine canyons of the Georges Bank, for example, euphausiid density is high (more than 1,000 individuals per square meter).
However, these species feed predominantly on the euphausiid Euphausia vallentini (Ridoux 1994), with mass of [approximately]0.1 g, representing only 0.0009% of the mass of a King Penguin.
Percent occurrence of 84 prey items was tallied (Table 2), of which 92% were of 2 species of euphausiid shrimp, Thysanoessa spinifera (16%) and Euphausia pacifica (76%).
In their natural setting, whale sharks are known to feed on a variety of prey including macrozooplankton such as euphausiid and sergestiid shrimps, calanoid copepods, fish eggs, coral spawn and, in larger individuals, small forage fishes such as anchovies (Rowat and Brooks, 2012).