euphemism


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eu·phe·mism

 (yo͞o′fə-mĭz′əm)
n.
1. A mild, indirect, or vague term for one that is considered harsh, blunt, or offensive: "Euphemisms such as 'slumber room' ... abound in the funeral business" (Jessica Mitford).
2. The use of such terms: "Euphemism is common in hospital and medical facilities where bodily functions need to be discussed" (Diane F. Halpern).

[Greek euphēmismos, from euphēmizein, to use auspicious words, from euphēmiā, use of auspicious words : eu-, eu- + phēmē, speech; see bhā- in Indo-European roots.]

eu′phe·mist n.
eu′phe·mis′tic (-mĭs′tĭk) adj.
eu′phe·mis′ti·cal·ly adv.

euphemism

(ˈjuːfɪˌmɪzəm)
n
1. (Linguistics) an inoffensive word or phrase substituted for one considered offensive or hurtful, esp one concerned with religion, sex, death, or excreta. Examples of euphemisms are sleep with for have sexual intercourse with; departed for dead; relieve oneself for urinate
2. (Linguistics) the use of such inoffensive words or phrases
[C17: from Greek euphēmismos, from eu- + phēmē speech]
ˌeupheˈmistic adj
ˌeupheˈmistically adv

eu•phe•mism

(ˈyu fəˌmɪz əm)

n.
1. the substitution of a mild or indirect expression for one thought to be offensive or blunt.
2. the expression so substituted: “To pass away” is a euphemism for “to die.”
[1650–60; < Greek euphēmismós; see euphemize, -ism]
eu′phe•mist, n.
eu`phe•mis′tic, eu`phe•mis′ti•cal, adj.
eu`phe•mis′ti•cal•ly, adv.

euphemism

1. the deliberate or polite use of a pleasant or neutral word or expression to avoid the emotional implications of a plain term, as passed over for died.
2. an instance of such use. Cf. dysphemism, genteelism. — euphemist, n. — euphemistic, euphemistical, euphemious, adj.
See also: Language

euphemism

An inoffensive substitute for a distasteful word or phrase.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.euphemism - an inoffensive or indirect expression that is substituted for one that is considered offensive or too harsh
neutralisation, neutralization - (euphemism) the removal of a threat by killing or destroying it (especially in a covert operation or military operation)
locution, saying, expression - a word or phrase that particular people use in particular situations; "pardon the expression"
exit, expiration, going, passing, departure, release, loss - euphemistic expressions for death; "thousands mourned his passing"
collateral damage - (euphemism) inadvertent casualties and destruction inflicted on civilians in the course of military operations
sanitation department - the department of local government responsible for collecting and disposing of garbage
bowel movement, bm, movement - a euphemism for defecation; "he had a bowel movement"
making water, passing water, wetting, leak - a euphemism for urination; "he had to take a leak"
dysphemism - an offensive or disparaging expression that is substituted for an inoffensive one; "his favorite dysphemism was to ask for axle grease when he wanted butter"

euphemism

noun polite term, substitute, understatement, alternative word, alternative expression, genteelism The term 'early retirement' is often a euphemism for `redundancy'.

euphemism

noun
The use or an instance of equivocal language:
Informal: waffle.
Translations
تَلْطيف الكَلام
eufemismus
eufemisme
eufemismikiertoilmaisukiertoilmaus
eufemizmus
skrauthvörf; veigrunarorî; fegrunarheiti
eufemistiniseufemizmas
eifēmisms
eufemizmus
kibar deyimörtmece

euphemism

[ˈjuːfɪmɪzəm] Neufemismo m
a euphemism forun eufemismo de ...

euphemism

[ˈjuːfəmɪzəm] neuphémisme m

euphemism

nEuphemismus m, → Hüllwort nt; a euphemism for somethingein Euphemismus mor verhüllender Ausdruck für etw

euphemism

[ˈjuːfəˌmɪzm] neufemismo

euphemism

(ˈjuːfəmizəm) noun
a pleasant name for something that is unpleasant. `Pass on' is a euphemism for `die'.
ˌeupheˈmistic adjective
References in classic literature ?
In verse 19 we are told what Nietzsche called Redemption--that is to say, the ability to say of all that is past: "Thus would I have it." The in ability to say this, and the resentment which results therefrom, he regards as the source of all our feelings of revenge, and all our desires to punish--punishment meaning to him merely a euphemism for the word revenge, invented in order to still our consciences.
Then beauty of style and harmony and grace and good rhythm depend on simplicity,--I mean the true simplicity of a rightly and nobly ordered mind and character, not that other simplicity which is only an euphemism for folly?
Seeing him thus quadrupedal in the grass, the priest raised his eyebrows rather sadly; and for the first time guessed that "fancies things" might be an euphemism.
It was something of a euphemism to call him a well-known man about town.
{boss = Cooper was annoyed by American euphemisms, such as using the Dutch word "boss" in place of "master"--a custom he blamed largely on New England "Yankees"}
Philip laughed savagely as he thought of her gentility and the refinement with which she ate her food; she could not bear a coarse word, so far as her limited vocabulary reached she had a passion for euphemisms, and she scented indecency everywhere; she never spoke of trousers but referred to them as nether garments; she thought it slightly indelicate to blow her nose and did it in a deprecating way.
Three to five "emerging managers" will be selected to manage each fund, (The term "emerging manager" was coined by WHC in the late '80s as a euphemism for minority managers.) The funds will invest in various domestic and international equities, intermediate bonds and mortgage-backed securities.
Not if this fine phrase is a euphemism for the mercifully defunct internationalism of Communism.
As the euphemism goes, John Ueberroth faces some real "challenges" with his recent promotion to president and COO of Hawaiian Airlines.
A euphemism for the type of imperialism predominant in continental Europe, America, and especially Great Britain at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century.
But sadly, over the weekend - days after Katie, 40, was pictured for 'people' on a date with 25-year-old Essex businessman Alex Adderson (above) - Kris announced the couple had split because they "both want different things" - quite possibly being a euphemism for "different people".
Doesn't this prove that when Christians defend their supernatural beliefs by describing them as 'faith', they are merely using the word faith as a euphemism for the word delusion?