euphemistically


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Related to euphemistically: pedantically

eu·phe·mism

 (yo͞o′fə-mĭz′əm)
n.
1. A mild, indirect, or vague term for one that is considered harsh, blunt, or offensive: "Euphemisms such as 'slumber room' ... abound in the funeral business" (Jessica Mitford).
2. The use of such terms: "Euphemism is common in hospital and medical facilities where bodily functions need to be discussed" (Diane F. Halpern).

[Greek euphēmismos, from euphēmizein, to use auspicious words, from euphēmiā, use of auspicious words : eu-, eu- + phēmē, speech; see bhā- in Indo-European roots.]

eu′phe·mist n.
eu′phe·mis′tic (-mĭs′tĭk) adj.
eu′phe·mis′ti·cal·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.euphemistically - in a euphemistic manner; "his violent death was euphemistically referred to as a passing away"
Translations

euphemistically

[ˌjuːfəˈmɪstɪkli] adv [call, describe] → par euphémisme

euphemistically

adveuphemistisch, verhüllend; to be euphemistically described/known as …beschönigend als … bezeichnet werden/bekannt sein

euphemistically

[ˌjuːfɪˈmɪstɪklɪ] adveufemisticamente
References in classic literature ?
To be plain, I had endured what is euphemistically called "disappointment" already; and, not being a complete coxcomb, I had no intention of courting a second.
In the 16th century Wales was unilaterally incorporated into England by the euphemistically termed "Act of Union" and the use of the native Welsh language in court proceedings was forbidden.
TEN-MAN Accies suffered a sickener at chilly Broadwood against what is euphemistically termed a side "full of enthusiasm".
The euphemistically named "Abortion Non-Discrimination Act" permits any health-care providers to refuse to provide an abortion, overriding any state or local laws that may require providers to offer the lull range of reproductive services in cases of medical emergency.
'Researcher links obesity to large food portions' -Headline in the Davao Sun and Star, Philipines'I'm often unlucky enough to be picked out for those euphemistically titled 'special searches' due to my obvious resemblance to Mr bin Laden, no doubt' -Actress Joan Collins on travelling in the United States'Alastair Campbell is a very interesting and amusing man, although it's a pity that, having peaked as a soft-porn journalist, he went downhill and became a pressman to the Prime Minister' -Tory peer Lord Tebbit
Not wanting to derail what is euphemistically referred to as the Mideast "peace process," the Bush administration joined the chorus of make-believe artists suggesting that the terror ship operation was the handiwork of a "rogue" element in the PA.
With Afghanistan people fed up with two decades of war, the warrior pool among them has been running low, increasing Taliban dependence on foreign fighters like bin Laden whom it euphemistically calls its "guests".
On March 29, the Hiroshima High Court overturned a landmark 1998 district court ruling ordering the Japanese government to compensate South Korean women forced to provide sex to Imperial Japanese Army soldiers, euphemistically called ''comfort women'' in Japan.
A good army must be able to do all of four different things: have an able-bodied and diversified battalion of soldiers, be able to recognize the enemy, be capable of repelling the enemy, and avoid destroying itself (an activity euphemistically referred to in modern warfare as "friendly fire").
Euphemistically known as "regulators,' the cops who investigate corporate crime face some of the most powerful lawbreakers in society without effective access to meaningful sanctions.
In a press briefing, South Korean foreign ministry spokesman Cho Byung Jae said the 1965 normalization treaty between Seoul and Tokyo does not cover issues related to compensation for the former sex slaves euphemistically called ''comfort women.''
On the NHS under Labour WHAT the NHS has now become is a self-perpetuating Stasi-style system of endless form-filling and fear of retribution for what is euphemistically called "breaches of confidentiality", in reality a veil of secrecy to hide the incompetence of the upper echelons.