euphuism

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eu·phu·ism

 (yo͞o′fyo͞o-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. An affectedly elegant literary style of the late 1500s and early 1600s, characterized by elaborate alliteration, antitheses, and similes.
2. Affected elegance of language.

[After Euphues, , a character in Euphues, the Anatomy of Wit and Euphues and his England by John Lyly, from Greek euphuēs, shapely : eu-, eu- + phuein, to grow, bring forth; see bheuə- in Indo-European roots.]

eu′phu·ist n.
eu′phu·is′tic, eu′phu·is′ti·cal adj.
eu′phu·is′ti·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

euphuism

(ˈjuːfjuːˌɪzəm)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an artificial prose style of the Elizabethan period, marked by extreme use of antithesis, alliteration, and extended similes and allusions
2. any stylish affectation in speech or writing, esp a rhetorical device or expression
[C16: after Euphues, prose romance by John Lyly]
ˈeuphuist n
ˌeuphuˈistic, ˌeuphuˈistical adj
ˌeuphuˈistically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

eu•phu•ism

(ˈyu fyuˌɪz əm)

n.
1. an affected style in imitation of that of John Lyly, fashionable in Elizabethan England and characterized chiefly by excessive antitheses, alliteration, and elaborate similes.
2. any similar ornate style of writing or speaking.
[1590–1600; after Euphues, the main character in Lyly's works; see -ism]
eu′phu•ist, n.
eu`phu•is′tic, eu`phu•is′ti•cal, adj.
eu`phu•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Euphuism

1. an elaborate prose style invented by John Lyly c. 1580, characterized by bountiful figures of speech, Latinisms, extended similes, frequent antitheses, and highly involved syntax.
2. any similar ornate style of writing or speaking. Cf. Gongorism. — euphuist, n. — euphuistic, adj.
See also: Literary Style
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

euphuism

A high-flown rhetorical literary style.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.euphuism - any artificially elegant style of language
expressive style, style - a way of expressing something (in language or art or music etc.) that is characteristic of a particular person or group of people or period; "all the reporters were expected to adopt the style of the newspaper"
Gongorism - an affected elegance of style that was introduced into Spanish literature by the poet Gongora
2.euphuism - an elegant style of prose of the Elizabethan period; characterized by balance and antithesis and alliteration and extended similes with and allusions to nature and mythology
prose - ordinary writing as distinguished from verse
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A Victorian author of the Short History of the English People (John Richard Green, 1874) could argue that "Elizabeth was the most affected and detestable of Euphuists").
Hence the appearance of Gongorists with their unnatural elegance, of cultists with their unorthodox ways, of Marinists with their contorted puns and intricate metaphors, of Euphuists with their artificial refinement, of the precieux (the "precious" ones, advocates of the French salon Preciosite) with their delicate manners and feelings, and lastly of the metaphysical poets with their (often exaggerated) extended use of conceits.
Though Huxley doubts that Ros ever encountered the work of the Elizabethan Euphuists, he concludes that Ros "arrived independently at precisely the same state of development as Lyly and his disciples" (137); in any society, Huxley asserts, early attempts at literary language "are always productive of the most elaborate artificiality" (138), and it takes centuries before writers recognize "that art [is] possible without artifice" (138).