eurhythmy


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Related to eurhythmy: eurythmy

eu·rhyth·my

 (yo͝o-rĭth′mē)
n.
Variant of eurythmy.

eurhythmy

(juːˈrɪðmɪ) or

eurythmy

n
1. (Dancing) rhythmic movement
2. harmonious structure
[C17: from Latin eurythmia, from Greek eurhuthmia, from eu- + rhuthmos proportion, rhythm]

eu•rhyth•my

(yʊˈrɪð mi, yə-)

n.
rhythmical movement or order; harmonious motion or proportion.
[1615–25; < Latin eurythmia < Greek eurythmía good proportion, gracefulness. See eu-, rhythm, -y3]

eurhythmy

an even pulsebeat. — eurhythmic, adj.
See also: Heart
harmonious proportions in a building.
See also: Architecture
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eurhythmy - the interpretation in harmonious bodily movements of the rhythm of musical compositions; used to teach musical understanding
movement, motility, motion, move - a change of position that does not entail a change of location; "the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprise"; "movement is a sign of life"; "an impatient move of his hand"; "gastrointestinal motility"
diversion, recreation - an activity that diverts or amuses or stimulates; "scuba diving is provided as a diversion for tourists"; "for recreation he wrote poetry and solved crossword puzzles"; "drug abuse is often regarded as a form of recreation"
References in periodicals archive ?
Beauty was a concept related to eurhythmy (https://dexonline.ro/defmitie/euritmie), as a harmonious combination of the component elements, lines and proportions with the moral virtues.
And so it was that Tilla enrolled in courses in speech, painting, lyre, and eurhythmy (a type of movement therapy).
This approach would give a solid support to classical eurhythmy. There may be a universal aesthetic preference for the golden section that is not based in mathematical reasons, but in the presence of little imperfections (Langlois, Ritter, Casey, & Sawin, 1995).
The ongoing confusion between the word, 'Eurhythmy, introduced into this country by Herr Rudolph Steiner' and the Eurhythmics of Jaques-Dalcroze was of considerable concern.
He said sport and exercise were forms of eurhythmy, or harmony in motion.