euryhaline


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eu·ry·ha·line

 (yo͝or′ə-hā′līn′, -hăl′īn′)
adj.
Capable of tolerating a wide range of salt water concentrations. Used of an aquatic organism.

euryhaline

(ˌjʊərɪˈheɪliːn; -laɪn)
adj
(Zoology) (of certain aquatic animals) able to tolerate a wide range of salinity. Compare stenohaline
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References in periodicals archive ?
Although this euryhaline crab species survives in a wide range of salinity conditions, different salinity conditions might influence its distribution and migration route (Shen & Liu 1965, Dai 1977, Dai et al.
armatus, a species characterized as euryhaline (Coelho 1963, 1964; Werding, 1978; Micheletti-Flores & Negreiros-Fransozo, 1999), the other porcellanid species occurring in this bay may have certain tolerance to this environmental variable.
Marine amoebae from waters of northwest Spain, with comments on a potentially pathogenic euryhaline species.
acuta is probably favored by its resistance to the changes in temperature and salinity, because of it is an eurytherme and euryhaline organism.
The bivalve Mytilus edulis is a euryhaline osmoconformer (Krogh 1939, Tedengren & Kautsky 1986) that occurs in environments ranging from full oceanic salinity (34) to mesohaline (5-18) estuarine conditions (Bayne 1976).
Developmental regulation of gastric pepsin and pancreatic serine protease in larvae of the euryhaline teleost, Oreochromis mossambicus.
Studies on salt tolerance of rotifers have so far concentrated on euryhaline species while very little information is available on noneuryhaline taxa.
Previous studies have shown that aquatic euryhaline animals depend on energetic reorganization to cope with ambient salinity changes (Tseng & Hwang 2008), showing that the osmoregulation of aquatic animals is an energy cost (20%-50% of total metabolic energy) process to maintain intracellular and extracellular osmotic equilibrium (Evans et al.
simplex was found in areas with water temperatures associated to SAAMW, and its abundance in low-salinity interior waters suggests a marked euryhaline nature.
Although osmoregulatory ability may to some extent dictate a crustacean's ability to exploit euryhaline environments (Barnes, 1967; Spaargaren, 1973), those areas are not strictly the domain of efficient osmoregulators.