euthymia


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Related to euthymia: cyclothymia, hypomania, euthymic

euthymia

(juːˈθɪmɪə)
n
(Psychology) psychol a pleasant state of mind
[eu- + -thymia]
References in periodicals archive ?
Some patients experience recurrent depressive episodes with intervening euthymia (recurrent major depression), whereas others experience depressive episodes punctuated by brief subthreshold hypomanic episodes.
Only 58% of patients who entered the study during an episode of illness achieved 8 consecutive weeks of euthymia. (5)
Because euthymia and normal functioning are important for long-term prognosis, we define treatment-resistance as failure to achieve both symptomatic and functional remission following an adequate course of therapy.
First treat acute mood symptoms, then reevaluate and possibly treat ADHD symptoms if they persist during euthymia (Algorithm 1, page 53).
Given the patient's lengthy period of euthymia and the absence of new medicines, dietary changes, or drug/alcohol intake, the psychiatrist suspects that the cause of her mood episode recurrence is related to the URI.
Women with bipolar disorder already are at a fivefold increased risk for postpartum depression, so discussion of sustaining euthymia during pregnancy for bipolar women is particularly timely given the focus nationally on treatment and prevention of postpartum depression.
Mood disorders previously known as affective disorders are divided into major depressive disorder (MDD) which is characterized by a single mood pole of major depression and bipolar disorders, having 3 distinct phases; the depressed phase, which mimics the clinical picture of major depression (lower pole), the manic or hypomanic phase (upper pole), and euthymia, or the asymptomatic phase.
For example, faster onset of action, complete restoration of euthymia, and beneficial effects on cognition and sexual functioning," according to Dr.
Studies show that the depressive, mania/hypomania crises are neurotoxic and cognitive impairment is present both in the acute phases as well as in euthymia. However, bipolar type I patients have more cognitive changes than type II patients, most likely due to greater toxicity of manic episodes, with greater release of inflammatory cytokines, reduction of brainderived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), higher oxidative stress and, consequently, loss of neuroprotective mechanisms (2).
(1,2) It was previously thought that its clinical characteristics and nature were only associated with affective episodes, however in recent years cognitive impairment has been described, primarily in memory, attention span and executive function, including during the euthymia, (3) as well as long-term progressive clinical deterioration in some patient subgroups.