evertor

Related to evertor: Everolimus

evertor

(ɪˈvɜːtə)
n
(Physiology) any muscle that turns a part outwards
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Electric stimulation and strengthening exercise was applied to ankle evertor muscles and ankle and toe dorsiflexor muscles.
(1) Conceived initially by Gleich (2) and reconsidered by Koutsogiannis, (3) it is a heel bone wedge osteotomy in which the resulted distal end is displaced medially and, additionally, downward, in order to convert the triceps surae in an invertor of the heel instead of an evertor in the deformed foot.
Being considered as a secondary extensor and evertor muscle, the published studies systematically included FT with the other peroneal muscles when studying human walking.
A correlation between MLA height and evertor muscles was found in a study conducted on elite gymnastics.25
Concentric evertor strength differences and functional ankle instability: a meta-analysis.
[5] It is postulated that the prophylactic brace did not provide adequate mechanical restraint to the weakened anterior and posterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments, thereby not stabilising the ankle joint, and did not improve the neural firing and subsequent evertor activation of the injured ankle's proprioceptors, which is similar to the theorisation of Anderson et al.
Eccentric/ concentric ratios at selected velocities for the invertor and evertor muscles of the chronically unstable ankle.
An examination by a neurologist confirmed high arched feet and champagne bottle-shaped legs, weakness in ankle dorsiflexion and evertor muscles.
However, success has been achieved in preventing inversion deformity through pre-selection based on evertor strength.
EVERTOR N legend John Bailey will be the guest of honour at a family fun day in support of a Merseyside children's charity.