every bit


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eve·ry

 (ĕv′rē)
adj.
1.
a. Constituting each and all members of a group without exception.
b. Being all possible: had every chance of winning, but lost.
2. Being each of a specified succession of objects or intervals: every third seat; every two hours.
3. Being the highest degree or expression of: showed us every attention; had every hope of succeeding.
Idioms:
every bit Informal
In all ways; equally: He is every bit as mean as she is.
every now and then/again
From time to time; occasionally.
every once in a while
From time to time; occasionally.
every other
Each alternate: She went to visit her aunt every other week.
every so often
At intervals; occasionally.
every which way Informal
1. In every direction.
2. In complete disorder.

[Middle English everi, everich, from Old English ǣfre ǣlc : ǣfre, ever; see aiw- in Indo-European roots + ǣlc, each; see līk- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: Every is representative of a group of English words and expressions that are singular in form but felt to be plural in sense. The class includes noun phrases introduced by every, any, and certain uses of some. These expressions invariably take a singular verb; we say Every car has (not have) been tested, Anyone is (not are) liable to fall ill, and Some pizza is left over from the party. But when a sentence contains a pronoun that refers to a previous noun phrase introduced by every, grammar and sense pull in different directions. The grammar of these expressions requires a singular pronoun, as in Every car must have its brakes tested, but the meaning often leads people to use the plural pronoun, as in Every car must have their brakes tested. The use of plural pronouns in such cases is common in speech, but it is still widely regarded as incorrect in writing. · The effort to adhere to the grammatical rule causes complications, however. The first is grammatical. When a pronoun refers to a phrase containing every or any that falls within a different independent clause, the pronoun cannot be singular. Thus it is not idiomatic to say Every man left; he took his raincoat with him. Nor is it grammatical to say No one could be seen, could he? If the plural forms seem wrong in these examples (Every man took their raincoat with them), one way around the problem is to rephrase the sentence so as to get the pronoun into the same clause (as in Every man left, taking his raincoat with him). Another is to substitute another word for every or any, usually by casting the entire sentence as plural, as in All the men left; they took their raincoats with them. · The second complication involves the issue of gender. When a phrase introduced by every or any refers to a group containing both men and women, what should the gender of the singular pronoun be? This matter is discussed in the Usage Notes at he and they. See Usage Notes at all, each, either, he1, neither, none, they.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.every bit - to the same degree (often followed by `as'); "they were equally beautiful"; "birds were singing and the child sang as sweetly"; "sang as sweetly as a nightingale"; "he is every bit as mean as she is"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
Rupert's Cavaliers were every bit as particular about their lace collars and frills as the lady whose pretty limbs once warmed this cambric.
The Mouse had a good cleaning out while the Cat was gone, and made the house tidy; but the greedy Cat ate the fat every bit up.
Only by watching closely moment by moment the movement of that flow and comparing it with the movement of the ship do we convince ourselves that every bit of it is occasioned by the forward movement of the ship, and that we were led into error by the fact that we ourselves were imperceptibly moving.
Every bit of the furniture was made of brightly polished tin--the tables, chairs, beds, and all--even the floors and walls were of tin.
"I'd give it all to you, the pirate gold and every bit of treasure we could dig up.
Each thing had a separate stem, and so had to be picked off the side of the box; but Dorothy found them all to be delicious, and she ate every bit of luncheon in the box before she had finished.
The old cynic chose to be vastly offended at this nicety; assuring me, repeatedly, that 'the barn was every bit as good' as I, 'and every bit as wollsome,' and wondering how I could fashion to be so conceited.
Every bit of flesh an' blood an' muscle is clean right down to the bones--and they're clean, too.
"O Wendy, who is she?" cried Nibs, every bit as excited as if he didn't know.
He made Philip acknowledge that those South Germans whom he saw in the Jesuit church were every bit as firmly convinced of the truth of Roman Catholicism as he was of that of the Church of England, and from that he led him to admit that the Mahommedan and the Buddhist were convinced also of the truth of their respective religions.
Lynde can pray every bit as well as Superintendent Bell and I've no doubt she could preach too with a little practice."
He waited for a moment, then cautiously, as if not to give offence: "I don't think we need lose much of that stuff, sir," he said, "I can sweep it up, every bit of it almost, and then we could sift the glass out.