evidenced


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ev·i·dence

 (ĕv′ĭ-dəns)
n.
1.
a. A thing or set of things helpful in forming a conclusion or judgment: The broken window was evidence that a burglary had taken place. Scientists weighed the evidence for and against the hypothesis.
b. Something indicative; an indication or set of indications: saw no evidence of grief on the mourner's face.
2. Law
a. The means by which an allegation may be proven, such as oral testimony, documents, or physical objects.
b. The set of legal rules determining what testimony, documents, and objects may be admitted as proof in a trial.
tr.v. ev·i·denced, ev·i·denc·ing, ev·i·denc·es
To indicate clearly; exemplify or prove: Her curiosity is evidenced by the number of books she owns.
Idiom:
in evidence
1. Plainly visible; to be seen: It was early, and few pedestrians were in evidence on the city streets.
2. Law As legal evidence: submitted the photograph in evidence.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin ēvidentia, from Latin ēvidēns, ēvident-, obvious; see evident.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.evidenced - supported by evidence; "their evidenced friendliness to the US"
proved, proven - established beyond doubt; "a proven liar"; "a Soviet leader of proven shrewdness"
References in periodicals archive ?
As evidenced by these statements, not everyone in the legal community agrees with any court decision admitting digital photographs under the current Rules of Evidence.
The level of attention to history and context is evidenced in the early chapters by Fraser, Gambrill, and Reid and Fortune who help the reader to understand current challenges and issues.
Mylroie's research and expertise on Iraq complemented the big-think strategizing of the neocons, and a symbiotic relationship developed between them, as evidenced by the garlands that the neocons bestowed upon her for her work.