evocative


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e·voc·a·tive

 (ĭ-vŏk′ə-tĭv)
adj.
Tending or having the power to evoke.

e·voc′a·tive·ly adv.
e·voc′a·tive·ness n.

evocative

(ɪˈvɒkətɪv) or

evocatory

adj
tending or serving to evoke
eˈvocatively adv
eˈvocativeness n

e•voc•a•tive

(ɪˈvɒk ə tɪv, ɪˈvoʊ kə-)

adj.
tending to evoke: perfume evocative of spring.
e•voc′a•tive•ly, adv.
e•voc′a•tive•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.evocative - serving to bring to mind; "cannot forbear to close on this redolent literary note"- Wilder Hobson; "a campaign redolent of machine politics"
mindful, aware - bearing in mind; attentive to; "ever mindful of her health"; "mindful of his responsibilities"; "mindful of these criticisms, I shall attempt to justify my action"

evocative

adjective expressive, moving, striking, revealing, pointed, pregnant, vivid, meaningful, poignant, eloquent, indicative, suggestive Aaron Copland's beautiful and evocative `Appalachian Spring'

evocative

adjective
Tending to bring a memory, mood, or image, for example, subtly or indirectly to mind:
Translations
مُثير للمَشاعِر، إيحائي
stemningsvækkendesuggestiv
felidézõ
sem kallar fram eîa vekur upp
vyvolávajúci
hayalinde canlandıran

evocative

[ɪˈvɒkətɪv] ADJevocador (of de)

evocative

[ɪˈvɒkətɪv] adjévocateur/trice

evocative

adjatmosphärisch; namewohlklingend; scent can be very evocativeein Duft kann viele Erinnerungen heraufbeschwören; to be evocative of somethingetw heraufbeschwören

evocative

[ɪˈvɒkətɪv] adj evocative (of)evocativo/a (di)

evoke

(iˈvəuk) verb
1. to cause or produce (especially a response, reaction etc). His letter in the newspaper evoked a storm of protest.
2. to bring into the mind. A piece of music can sometimes evoke (memories of) the past.
ˌevoˈcation (evəˈkeiʃn) , (ivouʃkeiʃn) noun
evocative (iˈvokətiv) adjective
tending to evoke memories etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wilson, human nature is characterized by archetypes; Speyer's recurring figures and erotically evocative palette (lurid violet, gentle green) seem to express surrender to erotic temptation as one of these.
Without falling into the trap of adhering strictly to the plot of Dante's narrative, Bigonzetti's work is fluid, rich in atmosphere and suggestion, evocative without being emphatic.
The whole of this outer part is almost as austere as Kampmann at his most fierce: the experiences are Sublime in Burke's sense (the aesthetic sense evocative of death and terror), rather than Beautiful (evocative of sex and sensual pleasure).
The index covers just about every botanical topic conceivable between "acacias" and "zygogynum." Bernhardt more than meets his stated goal of creating a book that is evocative of earlier nature writers such as James Berry and Harriet Keeler, while including updated information about structures and chemicals that these earlier writers in pre-electron micrograph days could never have dreamed of.
This is post-paisley abstraction at its most evocative, a focused pedal-to-the-metal loopiness that fully energizes the decorative and churns it into a charged vehicle for a kind of acrylic adrenaline.
The works ranged from an exploration of movement and its relationships with gravity to an evocative rendering of British Columbian art.
Parc Citroen in Paris is a modern version of the democratic, evocative, urban park.
Morrison, who reads her own novel, writes evocative fiction, though it is so often sad.
The unrestrained color and evocative words ("LIGHTNING," "BUTTERFLY") resulted from aesthetic choices, compositional or simply poetic, that represented an altogether different enterprise from that which governs the more restrictive documentary function and parameters (distance traveled, time spent) of his photo-texts.
The narrative in the three Allende stories Davidson uses -- "Wicked Girl," "Tosca," and "Revenge" -- is neatly linear; yet the stage portrait Davidson and her collaborators create is a rich collage of sound, text, and scenic elements, each one stunningly evocative of the cultural and emotional terrain of the stories.
The turquoise domes of Samarkand and Bukhara, in the former Soviet republic of Uzbekistan, are among the world's most evocative architectural symbols.
To quote KLIATT's July 2001 review of the hardcover edition: In her dark, evocative style, Block (author of Weetzie Bat and other YA novels) tells of a girl named Echo finding herself and finding love, in a series of linked stories set in L.A.